Cash Payoffs, Porngate and the Kathleen Kane Scandal headline "Keystone Corruption Continues"

kcc_fcHARRISBURG, Pa. — Sunbury Press has released Keystone Corruption Continues: Cash Payoffs, Porngate and the Kathleen Kane Scandal, Brad Bumsted’s latest compilation of Pennsylvania state government malfeasance.

About the Book:
Once again, a crime wave swept through Pennsylvania state government. During a 17-month period from early 2015 through mid-2016,  a sitting state treasurer, and a former state treasurer, both statewide elected officials who were guardians of taxpayers’ money, were charged with crimes, as was an ex-Governor’s chief of staff and the attorney general, the state’s chief law enforcement officer. It was preceded by a sting investigation that resulted in state legislators videotaped taking cash from an undercover operative posing as a lobbyist and an alleged pay to play scheme at the Pennsylvania Turnpike Commission. Porn and off-color emails  on government computers took out two Supreme Court justices. It’s all in Brad Bumsted’s latest book: Keystone Corruption Continues: Cash Payoffs, Porngate and the Kathleen Kane Scandal.

Contents:
Foreword by John Baer
Acknowledgments
Introduction: The Sting
1. Lost Opportunity
2. Turnpike Scandal
3. “I’m Your Guy”
4. Business As Usual
5. “Make Work” and Big Bucks
6. “I Am the Fucking Senator”
7. An Ivy League Shakedown
8. “Not Prosecutable”
9. The Sprague Threat
10. “I Am An Attorney”
11. The Sandusky Report
12. Seth
13. The Lex Street Massacre
14. The Very Questionable Accident
15. “Happy Birthday Ron Waters”
16. Bizarre 24 Hours
17. Difficult to Manage
18. “Political Peep Show”
19. “Unholy Mess”
20. Risa
21. The Cartels
22. The Supremes
23. Porn Warfare
24. Citizen Kane?
25. LCB’s “Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell” Culture
26. The Final Sting
27. In the Final Analysis
Epilogue by R.B. Swift
Reflections by Franklin Kury

bradbumstedAbout the Author:
Brad Bumsted is a prominent journalist in Pennsylvania, working for the Pittsburgh Tribune-Review. He is noted for writing “reform minded stories” about the Pennsylvania General Assembly.

In 2005, he was named one of “Pennsylvania’s Most Influential Reporters” by the Pennsylvania political news website PoliticsPA. In 2008, the political website PolitickerPA.com named him one of the “Most Powerful Political Reporters” in Pennsylvania. The Pennsylvania Report named him to the 2009 “The Pennsylvania Report 100” list of influential figures in Pennsylvania politics and described him as a “mainstay in the halls of the capitol.”

Keystone Corruption Continues: Cash Payoffs, Porngate and the Kathleen Kane Scandal
Authored by Brad Bumsted
List Price: $17.95
5.5″ x 8.5″ (13.97 x 21.59 cm)
Black & White on Cream paper
278 pages
Sunbury Press, Inc.
ISBN-13: 978-1620066935
ISBN-10: 1620066939
BISAC: Political Science / Government / State & Provincial

For more information, please see:
http://www.sunburypressstore.com/Keystone-Corruption-Cont…

Mental illness disrupts a Spanish family in New Mexico until a brave father steps forward

LAS VEGAS, N.M. — Sunbury Press has released Mela Suse Vigil Duran Carvalko’s memoir of her childhood titled Maybe Tomorrow.

About the Book:
A FAMILY THAT CONFRONTS THE FORCES OF MENTAL ILLNESS, AND LEARNS THAT NO BURDEN IS SO HEAVY AS TO DEFEAT AN ETERNAL LOVE.

mt_fcQuite apart from other memoirs, the author captivates the reader’s attention, by painting a portrait of  mental illness through the eyes of a child.  As a child growing up during the 40s and 50s, in the rural Spanish farming communities of New Mexico/Colorado, she recounts her father’s courage and refusal to accept the finality of his wife’s mental illness,  and how he single-handedly raised four daughters, teaching them what it means to survive, drawing strength from the pride of self-worth, and the humility of self-reliance.

Excerpt:
I have come full circle to the land of my father’s birth, Rociada, New Mexico, where I breathe in the aspirations of my ancestors, where I hear the swish of their scythe against the wheat, their plough turning a stubborn, bounteous earth, where I see the rutted and hooved reliefs of wagons and beasts, burdens, which led directly to a remarkable life, one guided by a dream of an angel sitting on my shoulder, watching over me.

The screams frightened me beyond verbal description, but this fright was quickly supplanted by the even greater one of not knowing where I was going and what waited for me at the top. We climbed the metal grated stairs, each step causing vibrations that made me feel they would collapse at any moment. The higher we climbed, the louder the screams became. I was afraid to go on, but afraid of what was behind me. As we ascended, my heart beat faster with each step. I felt sick to my stomach wondering what evil waited for me, but I never complained, and did what was expected of me. By the age of three I had learned to control my emotions, and as I grew older, I found that self-control in the face of the unknown would help me survive.

As we neared the top, I could hear doors creak open in front of us and slam shut behind us. When we reached the final step, we came to a lobby with a long hallway. The door closings reverberated off the high ceiling and masonry walls; harsh lights overhead reflected off shiny, off-white, dirty-beige, and pea-green walls. The floors were covered with hard linoleum squares, worn, scuffed, and cracked, and though polished to a high sheen, every square was embedded with the dirt of half a century.

About the Author:
MELA SUŚE VIGIL DURAN CARVALKO has spent many years investigating the genealogy of Spanish families that settled in San Miguel/Mora counties, New Mexico. In addition to documenting her accounts of the life and times during the mid-twentieth century, she devotes time as an artist and musician. She studied art at Sacred Heart University and mentored under impressionist artist Albert Werner.  Currently she lives between New Mexico and the east coast with her husband, three cats and dog Leila.

Maybe Tomorrow
Authored by Mela Suse Vigil Duran Carvalko
List Price: $19.95
6″ x 9″ (15.24 x 22.86 cm)
Black & White on Cream paper
280 pages
Sunbury Press, Inc.
ISBN-13: 978-1620067079
ISBN-10: 1620067072
BISAC: Family & Relationships / Dysfunctional Families

Also available on Kindle

For more information, please see:
http://www.sunburypressstore.com/Maybe-Tomorrow-978162006…

As the Greenland ice melts, something horrible lurks beneath

WOODS HOLE, Mass. — Sunbury Press has released the climate fiction (Cli-Fi) thriller Ice Canyon Monster, Keith Rommel’s novella about the consequences of global warming.

What Others Are Saying:
When a Greenland shaman decides to fight back against global warming and the harm it is doing to his people, a powerful series of events unfolds in this cli-fi thriller. Keith Rommel knows how to spin a great yarn!
– Dan Bloom, The Cli-Fi Report

About the Book:
icm_fcHUNGER WILL BRING ANYTHING TO THE SURFACE …
The Eskimo people of Greenland have grown tired of the damage being done to their country. Global warming from emissions that stem from the shipping lanes that run between Canada and Greenland has made people that live close to the coast sick. Cancer, asthma and as many as 5,000 deaths a year have been attributed to this pollution. A single cargo ship in one year burns more emissions than 50 million gasoline burning vehicles.

When Akutak, a Greenlandic Shaman Eskimo, decides to take action against the things that are destroying his country, he uses the ancient arts and creates a tupilak and with it and conjures a curse. Designed in the form of an octopus, this Goliath is going to become Greenland’s guardian and do everything within its power to stop the erosion of the ice sheet.

But not everyone sees the Tupilak Octopus as a champion and they seek to destroy it. But the only way to destroy it is to conjure something more powerful and Akutak may be Greenland’s most powerful shaman.

This novelette is part of the Cli-Fi movement and contains stunning facts surrounding Greenland and the danger this beautiful country faces from big oil to overused shipping lanes. Akutak and his Tupilak Octopus has one message: leave Greenland alone! – Read this highly educational novel with a great fiction story intertwined within the startling facts.

Excerpt:
Akutak knelt down on the hard, cold surface of a mountainous ice sheet that overlooked the valley’s deep ice canyon. A large rivulet carried fast-moving glacial water, and the sound of the running river was loud enough to reach Akutak even at this altitude.

Located in the interior of Greenland, beneath the ice sheet and river flow, was a canyon that snaked around and reached the Petermann Glacier on the northern coast. The water melt also flowed beneath the ice and was released into the Arctic Ocean.

True to old tradition almost lost throughout the centuries, Akutak wore the skins of animals that were captured for their meat. The skins were sewn together by his wife. She was a skilled seamstress and made him kamiks, trousers and anoraks, gloves and a hat. It was her skill that protected him against the harsh elements and kept him alive. Knowing she made the clothing, the frigid cold was of no concern; in Greenland it is said a man is what his wife makes him.

Opening the flap of an animal skin sack that was slung over his shoulder, he peered inside and saw what he had placed there before he left home at first light.

The wind whipped and reminded Akutak that where he was was inhospitable and unwelcoming. But still, he continued to move forward with the plan that took him nearly two years to complete; shrouded in silence even to his kin. What he created and what he was about to do was never shared with anyone else. It couldn’t be because that was the way.

He carefully reached into his sack and pulled out a hand-sized tupilaq. This carefully handmade avenging monster was created to keep people away from his native land, which was shrinking each year because of global warming.

The shaman began to chant in his native tongue of Inuit. He called forth in a repeated rhythmic sound, reciting his desire to make those who caused it to pay for what his country was suffering. He wanted to instill fear and summoned a beast, large and unstoppable, filled with the rage of his ancestors. This beast would do terrible things to keep people away from Greenland.

He looked at the tupilaq, made the traditional way to ensure its effectiveness; the design represented exactly what he foresaw as being the bringer of fear and order, death, and a reluctance to challenge the waters around Greenland. Made from carved bone, dried and stretched skin, woven hair and sinew, the totem even contained parts from dead children.

Drawing himself close to the ridge, each footfall carefully placed so as not to plunge to his death, his chant continued as he looked over the edge and into the clear water. He held onto the tupilaq, looked at his work one last time to make sure it was good enough, and then held it out and released it over the flowing water.

About the Author:
Keith Rommel is the author of numerous fiction thrillers, best known for his Thanatology Series, which includes The Cursed Man, and The Lurking Man, both of which are becoming Hollywood movies. Keith is also a screenwriter.

Ice Canyon Monster
Authored by Keith Rommel
List Price: $9.99
5″ x 8″ (12.7 x 20.32 cm)
Black & White on Cream paper
136 pages
Sunbury Press, Inc.
ISBN-13: 978-1620067222
ISBN-10: 1620067226
BISAC: Fiction / Sea Stories

Also available on Kindle

For more information, please see:
http://www.sunburypressstore.com/Ice-Canyon-Monster-9781620067222.htm

Former English teacher/ librarian releases second book for kids

Author Sherri Maret (right) on her visit to the Shippensburg Area Intermediate Unit. Illustrator Noelle Ziegler (Help Me!) is on the left. Librarian Beth Jones is in the cage.

Author Sherri Maret (right) on her visit to the Shippensburg Area Intermediate Unit. Illustrator Noelle Ziegler (Help Me!) is on the left. Librarian Beth Jones is in the cage.

NEWVILLE – Sherri Maret is a newly published author living her dream.

“I taught for 20 years as an English teacher and library media specialist in Chambersburg, Cumberland Valley, and Shippensburg school districts,” Maret said in a press release. “I loved teaching, but I wanted to write children’s books, too.”

In April 2016, Maret released her first book, “Help Me!”, about a lady who loves animals who flies to Africa for an amazing animal adventure. When it is time to go home, she decides she wants to take a baby animal home with her. The lady ends up having a very different kind of adventure that wasn’t at all what she had planned.

Maret’s new book, “The Gingerbread Man’s School Adventure,” will be released Aug. 1.  She said she wrote it primarily for the kindergarten teachers she worked with at James Burd Elementary School in Shippensburg. In it, a gingerbread man who fears he will be eaten by two children or their mother finds himself at an elementary school seeking help from many of the people who work there.

“Originally, it was to introduce kindergartners to elementary school, but then I decided to adjust it so it serves as a back-to-school book, too,” Maret said.

As an educator she knows teachers and librarians are busy, so she created multiple follow-up activities that are available on her website, www.sherrimaret.com.  “I spent so much time creating lessons and activities for my students when I taught.  I know how hard teachers/ librarians work, so I wanted to help them.”  Parents who homeschool their children might also find the activities helpful, she said.

tgmsa_fc“I wish I could draw but I don’t have the talent,” Maret said. “I was lucky to find two very talented students when I taught at the Shippensburg Area Senior High School.”

Noelle Zeigler,a 2016 SASHS graduate, illustrated “Help Me!” Emily McMichael, a 2015 SASHS graduate, illustrated “The Gingerbread Man’s School Adventure.”

“Noelle and I did eight school presentations on our publishing journey in Shippensburg. We had a great time.  I hope we get to do more,” Maret said.

The author also worked for the Chambersburg Area School District at Faust and Chambersburg Area Senior High schools from 1997 to 2003. “Sometimes I run into former CASD students, which is fun,” she said. “It doesn’t happen very often since I now live in Newville.”

Maret will have a reading at Grove Family Library, 101 Ragged Edge Road, Chambersburg, from 6-7 p.m. on Friday, Aug. 5, and a book signing from 9:30-10:15 a.m. on Saturday, Aug. 6.

Her books may be purchased from the author, online through Sunbury Press or through major online/ traditional bookstores.

(from The Public Opinion July 21, 2016: http://www.publicopiniononline.com/story/life/2016/07/21/former-english-teacher-librarian-releases-second-book-kids/87420566/)

Fifty years of research to make "Cast Iron Signs of Pennsylvania Towns and Other Landmarks."

MECHANICSBURG, Pa. — Sunbury Press has released Cast Iron Signs of Pennsylvania Towns and Other Landmarks, N. Clair Clawser’s compilation of early roadside markers in the Keystone state.

About the Book:
cis_fcAuthor and field researcher N. Clair Clawser has spent over 50 years traveling the highways and thoroughfares of Pennsylvania to capture images of the cast iron road signs placed there in the early days of automobiles. Many of these signs are long gone, but quite a few remain and have been restored.

Pennsylvania is unique with this type of town sign, which could become a thing of the past. (New York State has many cast iron signs, too, but they are on many subjects and not necessarily on town names.) Almost from the start Clair noticed some of these signs were being removed, even as he discovered that many still remained. Originally cast from about 1929 until 1942, these signs were made largely in either the Carlisle Foundry in Carlisle or Geiser Manufacturing Company in Waynesboro. Both companies are long out of business. There are a small number that were produced elsewhere, but not many. (Allegheny Foundry.) Jack Graham of the Keystone Markers Trust stated that the Department of Highways report for 1928-1930 said, “During the biennium 1,359 information signs were placed including historical, stream, state institution, speed limit and parking restriction signs.”

Many of these signs endure to this day, but are in constant danger of removal. A few new ones have been posted, but many more should be. The aforementioned report does not say how many were town signs. If the total was all towns and divided by 4 that would only be 339 towns. There are numerous stream signs still in existence today. These are 2-sided with just the name. Town signs are one-sided. We can only imagine that each town that had a cast iron sign may have had 4, one for each direction. Very few towns, that still have a sign, have more than two today. Hanover, a rarity, has six. Gettysburg has 4, as does Jonestown. York New Salem has 3, as does Lemoyne. Rothsville had 4, but one was removed. Schoeneck has 4 new ones installed by the Keystone Markers Trust, and Mountville has 3.

Signs from 67 Pennsylvania counties are listed, including the known contents each sign. Pictures are shown where available.

Cast Iron Signs of Pennsylvania Towns and Other Landmarks
Authored by N. Clair Clawser
List Price: $24.95
Hardcover: 146 pages
Publisher: Sunbury Press, Inc. (July 10, 2016)
Language: English
ISBN-10: 1620067374
ISBN-13: 978-1620067376
Product Dimensions: 6 x 0.5 x 9 inches
HISTORY / United States / State & Local / Middle Atlantic
TRANSPORTATION / Automotive / History
TRAVEL / Special Interest / General

For more information, please see:
http://www.sunburypressstore.com/Cast-Iron-Signs-of-Penns…

Is the future duke hiding as an opera singer? 12-year-old Franni knows and won't tell.

MANTUA, ItalyJuly 18, 2016PRLog — Sunbury Press has released Franni and the Duke, Anne E. Johnson’s middle-grade novel about two sisters trying out for Monteverdi’s opera in 1608, only to stumble upon a handsome and mysterious singer.

FATD_fcAbout the Book:
In May of 1608, the Duke of Mantua will throw the most spectacular wedding extravaganza in history. But it will all be ruined unless twelve-year-old Franni can keep a very big secret.

Franni and the Duke, a middle-grade novel, sets a fictional mystery against a specific historical backdrop. It takes place during rehearsals for Arianna, an opera by the great composer Claudio Monteverdi. When Franni and her older sister Alli run away to Mantua, they both find work in Monteverdi’s company. A messenger from the north announces that the next duke of the town of Bergamo is missing, and he may well be in Mantua. Alli notices that Luca, a singer she’s in love with, fits the missing Duke’s description. Although Franni thinks Luca is a pompous idiot, she promises for Alli’s sake to keep Luca’s secret safe and protect him from bounty hunters and Bergamo’s rival family. She does this with the help of the company’s set designer, a worldly wise and world-weary dwarf named Edgardo, who is not exactly what he seems.

Claudio Monteverdi

Claudio Monteverdi

Excerpt:
Thursday, May 8, 1608
“I’m hungry,” said Franni. She ached all over from hours of walking down rocky roads in the Northern Italian countryside. “Please, can we get some food, Alli?” She shivered in the chilly spring drizzle.

Franni’s older sister, Alessandra, walked in front as usual. She looked back and smiled weakly. “I know you’re hungry, Franni. I am, too.” Alli’s eyes were glassy in her drawn face. “We’re almost to Mantua. That’s a big city with lots of rich people. I’m sure someone will take pity on us there.”

Although Franni doubted it, she nodded. A day and a half ago, they’d run away from their stepfather in Verona. They’d left in the middle of the night, carrying only a satchel of clothes each, and one loaf of bread between them. The last town they’d been through hadn’t shown them much pity. When they’d taken a drink at the central fountain, a soldier had chased them right out of town.

“I’m so tired.” She hardly had the strength to get any sound out. There was no way Franni could take another step, so she sat down right there in the road.

Alli grabbed Franni’s elbow and yanked. “Come on. We’ve got to get to Mantua before the sun goes down.” A slender, delicate creature of seventeen, Alli was no match for Franni when the younger girl felt stubborn. Franni willed herself to weigh as much as the elephant her real father once saw in Algiers. He’d said it was the size of twenty men. Closing her eyes, Franni glued herself to the paving stones, thinking heavy thoughts.

“A cart!” Alli let go of Franni’s arm and stood up, waving.

Franni’s heavy mood turned to dandelion seeds and floated away. “A cart?” She craned to see the black horse drawing a workman’s cart slowly along the road toward them. “Do you think he’ll give us a ride?”

“He has to,” said Alli. It sounded like a prayer. “He just has to.”

We’re saved! thought Franni. But when the cart pulled near enough that they could smell the tang of horse sweat, she changed her mind. “He’s an undertaker,” she whispered. “Look at the white marble slabs he’s dragging in that cart. It would be bad luck to ride with him.” She backed off the road and pulled her embroidered scarf over her head and face.

To Franni’s distress, Alli stepped into the middle of the road and waved her arms wider. If only their mother could see them now, two noble girls, behaving like beggars. Surely Mama could see them as she looked down from Heaven. She probably also saw how their stepfather treated the girls after their mother died. Franni was sure Mama up in Heaven approved of how she and Alli had sneaked out of the gates of Verona one night to find a happier life.

“Whoa!” said the cart driver, pulling back on the horse’s reins. “What is it, child? Why are you in the road? Do you need help?”

About the Author:
Anne E. Johnson taught music history for many years in New York City, specializing in the Baroque and Renaissance periods, and she feels a particular connection to the music and times of Claudio Monteverdi. Besides fiction, she has also written performing arts journalism for publications includingThe New York Times and Stagebill Magazine. Dozens of her short stories, for both kids and adults, have appeared in print and online.

Anne lives in Brooklyn with her husband, playwright Ken Munch. When she’s not writing or editing, she’s probably baking or going to concerts and plays. Her website is http://AnneEJohnson.com.

Franni and the Duke
Authored by Anne E. Johnson
List Price: $9.99
5.5″ x 8.5″ (13.97 x 21.59 cm)
Black & White on Cream paper
156 pages
Sunbury Press, Inc.
ISBN-13: 978-1620067031
ISBN-10: 162006703X
BISAC: Juvenile Fiction / Performing Arts / Theater

For more information, please see:
http://www.sunburypressstore.com/Franni-and-the-Duke-9781…

Paul Sorvino: "'The Making of a Don' is atavistic, primitive, and oh so hard to put down."

NEW YORK — Sunbury Press has released The Making of a Don, Charles Ursitti’s fictionalized account of the rise of a Mafia boss in New York’s Little Italy decades ago.

Paul Sorvino

Paul Sorvino

What Others Are Saying:
This book is most rare in its chronicling of a mafia family. Ursitti tells the story without sentimentality or literary agenda. As easily as ordering a plate of pasta with sausages. His style seeks no approval for itself but in short order the minimalism, nay innocence, compels and invades so that you feel you are in the very rooms where the hits are agreed to and business is set aright and lurking death is assuaged once more. Atavistic, primitive and oh so hard to put down! — PAUL SORVINO (actor: Good Fellas, Nixon, Law & Order, Murder She Wrote, Moonlighting …)

About the Book:
Frankie Boy reminisces about his childhood living in a big, Italian, Mafia family in New York City and how excited everyone would get each time Uncle Frank, also his mentor and idol, came by his grandma’s house for a delicious, Italian meal. Uncle Frank is Frankie Boy’s entire world growing up, and he continues to be so throughout his life. However, Frankie Boy wants to pave his own path in life, a life of legitimacy, and a life where his hard-earned degree is being put to good use. With the help and support of Uncle Frank, he is able to do so. However, life doesn’t always unravel exactly as we’d like it to, especially when your uncle is Capo dei Capi, Boss of Bosses, and Frankie Boy finds himself once again searching for his place and purpose in life. Uncle Frank once again offers him the opportunity to learn tmoad_fcthe family business, and after much deliberating, Frankie Boy begins learning the ins and outs of mob life with his best friend Nicky at his side, a loyal and loving friend that goes to extreme lengths to ensure the success of Frankie.

The Making of a Don is a raw and very real portrayal of the inner workings and hierarchy of the Italian Mafia. Frankie Boy works his way up from the very bottom with the experienced guidance of his uncle, and he learns that even those that are closest, those that are “family,” can still betray you in the worst ways possible. Frankie must decide who he can really trust, who has his back, and what lengths to take to protect his business, his family, and his friendships. Nothing is at it seems when you’re in the mob, and Frankie must find ways to ensure all five families are happy and under his thumb.

About the Author:
Charles J. Ursitti grew up in New York City and has spent most of his life there.

After working in the corporate world for ten years, Charles turned his talents into producing and promoting billiards. His events were aired on ABC’s Wide World of Sports with Howard Cosell for five years, CBS Sports Spectacular with John Madden for seven years, NBC’s Sport World, ESPN, USA Cable and numerous other local cable stations. He managed and promoted the legends of the game including Willie Mosconi, Minnesota Fats, and Steve Mizerak, just to name a few. He also created

Charles Ursitti (right) shaking Willie Mosconi's hand while Howard Cosell looks on.

Charles Ursitti (right) shaking Willie Mosconi’s hand while Howard Cosell looks on.

the most accurate and complete history of both pocket billiards and three cushion billiards from their inception in 1878 to present times. He is known as one of the most knowledgeable billiard historians in the world. His efforts were rewarded when on October 29, 2015 Charlie became the 66th inductee in the prestigious Billiard Congress of America’s Hall of Fame.

Charlie was also a firearms designer and a professional skeet, trap and handgun shooter. After a severe car accident in April of 2000, he retired from shooting and turned his skills to writing. He wrote for several billiard magazines and then turned to writing novels.

The Making Of A Don is his first published novel.

The Making of a Don
Authored by Charles J. Ursitti
List Price: $9.99
5.5″ x 8.5″ (13.97 x 21.59 cm)
Black & White on Cream paper
144 pages
Sunbury Press, Inc.
ISBN-13: 978-1620066775
ISBN-10: 1620066777
BISAC: Fiction / Thrillers / Crime

Also available on Kindle

For more information, please see:
http://www.sunburypressstore.com/The-Making-of-a-Don-9781…

Michele Livingston's "Living in the Afterlife" is the Sunbury Press bestseller for June

MECHANICSBURG, Pa. — Sunbury Press has released the bestsellers list for June. Michele Livingston’s record of her channeled spirit encounters, Living in the Afterlife earned the top spot. A Year of Change and Consequences by former governor Mark Singel was second.

SUNBURY PRESS – Bestsellers for June, 2016 (by Revenue)
Rank Last Month Title Author Category
1 NEW Living in the Afterlife Michele Livingston Spirituality
2 NEW A Year of Change & Consequences Mark Singel Political Memoir
3 NEW Bitter Sweet Catherine Jordan et al. Short Stories
4 Messages from Beyond Michele Livingston Spirituality
5 1 What Do You Say? James Campbell Pastoral Resources
6 What Springs from Rain? Lindsay Lough Nature
7 NEW Wonder Boy: The Story of Carl Scheib Lawrence Knorr Sports Biography
8 The Keeper of the Crows Kyle Alexander Romines Thriller Fiction
9 From Blue Ground Joe Harvey YA Fiction
10 6 The B Team Alan Mindell Sports Fiction
11 Jesus the Phoenician Karim El Koussa Religious History
12 The Phoenician Code Karim El Koussa Metaphysical Fiction
13 15 Pit Bulls Anthony Julian History
14 4 Israel Under Siege Scot McCauley Espionage Fiction
15 9 Where Elephants Fought Bridget Smith Historical Fiction
16 Head Over Wheels Ken Mercurio Medical Memoir
17 19 Freemasons at Gettysburg Sheldon Munn History
18 Dinorific Poetry Volume 1 Mike & Ethan Sgrignoli Childrens
19 20 The Closer Alan Mindell Sports Fiction
20 8 Amelia Earhart: The Truth at Last, 2nd Ed. Mike Campbell History
21 Raising Monarchs Sue Fox McGovern Nature
22 23 That Night at Surigao Ernie Marshall History
23 3 Choice of Enemies M A Richards Spy Thriller
24 2 Winter of the Metal People Dennis Herrick Historical Fiction
25 NEW OneWay: The Oracle Robin McClellan & Ruth Watson Metaphysical Fiction
26 11 Call Sign Dracula Joe Fair Vietnam Memoir
27 Dead of Autumn Sherry Knowlton Thriller Fiction
28 Dead of Summer Sherry Knowlton Thriller Fiction
29 Hidden Dangers Bob Stout Geopolitics
30 24 The Ripper’s Haunts Michael Hawley History

lita_fcMichele Livingston’s “Living in the Afterlife” debuted in the top spot thanks to advance sales prior to her appearance at the Lily Dale Assembly in Lily Dale, NY in July. Her “Messages from Beyond” also took #4. Former Pennsylvania governor Mark Singel’s new release, “A Year of Change and Consequences”shot out of the gate to #2 thanks to attention in the press. “Bitter Sweet,” the short story anthology shepherded by editor Catherine Jordan, who led the writing workshop at the Fredericksen Library in Camp Hill, rocketed to #3 due to strong sales at the library’s release celebration. All author proceeds and profits were donated to the library. “What Do You Say?,” last month’s bestseller, hung onto #5 thanks to author activities. The late Lindsay Lough’s previously discontinued pictorial compilation of the Ecuadoran rain forest, “What Springs of Rain,” placed at #6 thanks to a large order from the family to be shared in remembrance with those who attended her memorial service. Lawrence Knorr’s “Wonder Boy: The Story of Carl Scheib” took #7 in advance of the book release party in Gratz in early July. Kyle Romines “The Keeper of the Crows” returned to the rankings at #8 thanks to author activities. “The Blue Ground,” by Joe Harvey, grabbed #9 as interest increased thanks to reviews. Alan Mindell’s “The B Team” took #10 and “The Closer” #19 thanks to author appearances in southern California. Karim El Koussa netted #11 and #12 with “Jesus the Phoenician” and “The Phoenician Code” thanks to export orders. Anthony Julian’s “Pit Bulls” held at #13 as interest in the breed continues to be strong. Admiral McCauley’s international thriller “Israel Under Siege” slipped to #14 following his book release party at Bay Books in Coronado, California. Bridget Smith’s historical fiction “Where Elephants Fought,” about a Confederate general, rode in at #15 as the author continued her speaking rounds. Ken Mercurio’s “Head Over Wheels,” recounting his cycling mishap and subsequent medical recovery, returned to the rankings at #16 due to seasonal interest. Sheldon Munn’s “Freemasons at Gettysburg” held at #17 thanks to steady orders from gift shops in Gettysburg. The Sgrignoli’s “Dinorific Poetry Volume 1” re-appeared in the rankings at #18 thanks to author activities. Mike Campbell’s “Amelia Earhart: The Truth at Last” continues to sell well at #20 as readers acquire this second edition. Sue Fox McGovern’s “Raising Monarchs,” instructing us how to save the butterfly species, charted at #21 thanks to sales to lawn and garden stores in the midwest. Ernie Marshall’s “That Night at Surigao” moved up to #22 due to continued interest in the subject matter. M A Richards’ spy thriller “A Choice of Enemies” slid to #23 as his tour of bookstores in the northeast wound down. “Winter of the Metal People” by Dennis Herrick held at #24 due to sales in New Mexico. “OneWay: The Oracle” by Robin McClellan and Ruth Watson debuted at #25 thanks to interest in the Harrisburg area. Joe Fair’s Viet Nam memoir “Call Sign Dracula” continues to sell well among the veterans, ranking #26. Sherry Knowlton’s publicity efforts yielded #27 & #28 for “Dead of Autumn” and “Dead of Summer.” Increasing concern about tensions at the Mexican border has caused Bob Stout’s “Hidden Danger” to rise onto the chart at #29. Michael Hawley’s “The Ripper’s Haunts” held on at #30 as it continues to get interest from Ripper fans.

The company released four new titles in June:

SUNBURY PRESS – New Releases for June, 2016
OneWay: The Oracle Robin McClellan & Ruth Watson Metaphysical Fiction
Living in the Afterlife Michele Livingston Spirituality
A Year of Change & Consequences Mark Singel Political Memoir
Bitter Sweet Catherine Jordan et al. Short Stories

For more info: http://www.sunburypressstore.com/BESTSELLERS_c3.htm

Lawrence Knorr's remarks about "Wonder Boy" Carl Scheib at the Gratz Historical Society

Gratz, PA (July 7, 2016) — Former major league baseball player Carl Scheib, the subject of the recent biography Wonder Boy: The Story of Carl Scheib — The Youngest Player in American League History, traveled to his hometown of Gratz, Pennsylvania from his residence in San Antonio, Texas for a presentation and book signing on Thursday July 7th, 2016, held at the Gratz Community Center. The event was organized by the Gratz Historical Society. ABC27 from Harrisburg and The Citizen Standard covered the event, which was well-attended–over 120 people were present.

(Click here for the ABC27 story by Ross Lippman)

wb_fcFollowing is a transcript of the remarks made by Lawrence Knorr, the author or Wonder Boy:

Welcome everyone!  What a turnout!  Thank you so much for coming out this evening to support Carl Scheib. Carl, Sunbury Press, and the Gratz Historical Society all thank you for doing so.

My name is Lawrence Knorr. I am the author of Wonder Boy: The Story of Carl Scheib — The Youngest Player in American League History.  My ancestors are from the nearby Mahantongo Valley, near the village of Rough and Ready and Salem Church, just a few miles from here. I’ll never forget the first time I saw the valley, crossing over Mahantongo Moutain. At the peak, I looked out and saw the beautiful Mahantongo Valley before me with the Salem Church nestled below. It was a sight to see. I have collaborated in several books about the area, and as the owner of Sunbury Press, have published a number of books about the region, including those by Steve Troutman, whom many of you know.

So, many people have asked me … why write a book about Carl Scheib?  Some have even asked me if I did it because I was related to him.  The truth starts with a funny story.  A few years ago, while working with Joe Farrell and Joe Farley of the Keystone Tombstones series, which we publish, I was looking for interesting stories for their Sports volume.  I stumbled across Carl’s story online — the youngest player in modern history when he came up — and saw he was from Gratz, Pennsylvania. Given his age, I figured he was probably dead and buried in Pennsylvania. The Joes write about famous or noteworthy people buried in Pennsylvania.  So, I called the Joes and told them about Carl, and they were intrigued.  A few days later, I had dug further into Carl’s situation and found him alive and well in San Antonio, Texas. I called the Joes back and let them know Carl was off the list — he was still alive!  They expressed a little disappointment, and then I declared I would write his biography anyway.

I reached out to Carl with a letter and soon we were talking on the phone and via the mail. We agreed it would be best to meet in person at his home. My wife, Tammi, and I flew to San Antonio and spent three days with Carl reviewing his memorabilia and photographs and interviewing him about his life and his days in baseball.  We also attended a couple Texas League games at the Missions ballpark.  It was a lot of fun to watch a few games with Carl and talk about baseball.

The book took two years to write — part time — and was released by Sunbury Press last month. It relates the interesting story of Carl’s rise from high school ball to the major leagues at the age of 16, and recounts every major league appearance he made.

The story of Carl’s discovery, due to the actions of a local grocery clerk, Hannah Clark, and a traveling salesman, Al Grossman is somewhat apocryphal.  The story was repeated again in a recent news article in the Harrisburg paper.  What is not told is that Hannah was much more than a grocery clerk.  She was Carl’s cousin!  What also was not told accurately by Clifford Kachline back in 1948 in The Sporting News was story of Carl’s tryout. In those days, they embellished news stories to put a family-oriented spin on them. In the story, it was assumed Carl’s father drove him to the tryout in 1942, when Carl was 15. What he didn’t say was that Gummy Rothermal, an older pitcher on the Dalmatia team in the West Branch League drove Carl because he had a good car.  Can you imagine two young lads, in 1942, driving on the two lane roads from the valley to Philadelphia — over 100 miles — to try out for a major league team?  I can only imagine the conversation they had. I am sure Gummy hoped he’d get a tryout too, but that didn’t happen.

Carl had been a high school star in 9th, 10th, and 11th grades. Gratz won the baseball championship in 1941, and in 1942 with Carl as their ace pitcher. Carl was also invited to pitch for Dalmatia in the West Branch League … a town league of adult men who admitted teenage players during the war years.

Carl went to his tryout at Shibe Park in Philadelphia. It was raining that morning, and the game had been canceled. At first Carl thought the tryout was canceled too! But, after he found his way into the Athletics’ ballpark, he received his tryout in front of Connie Mack and others in the A’s brass. Connie told him to hurry back next year, after school was out.

LK headshot

Author Lawrence Knorr

Carl went home and did just that. The following spring, in 1943, after school was out, he quit high school and headed to Philadelphia. He initially was a batting practice pitcher, and then began taking trips on the train with the team. By September, he was ready to go, and signed a contract. At this point, his father came from Gratz to co-sign, since he was underage. Carl then entered his first game that day — against the New York Yankees!

When he walked onto the field, Carl was the youngest player in modern major league history.  There had been some younger players back in the 1800s, but no one as young as Carl, at 16 years, had played major league baseball since. He was used sparingly in relief the rest of the way and had respectable numbers. The next year, a 15 year old named Joe Nuxhall threw less than an inning of crappy ball giving up five runs on five walks and two hits. Nuxhall then went to the minors and did not return for seven years!  Carl stuck in the big leagues and got better and better. Personally, I think there should be an asterisk next to Nuxhall’s appearance, but it is, what it is. Carl is still the youngest player to have ever appeared in the American League.

Carl was with the A’s the whole season in 1944, and then when he turned 18, in 1945, he was drafted into the Army early that season. Fortunately, the war was ending when Carl went off to Germany as one of the occupation troops. He was stationed at Nuremburg during the trials. He participated on two different teams in the Army, and won nearly all of his games, including the GI championship in Germany.

Upon his return in 1947, Carl was back with the A’s and continued what many would say was just an “average” major league career. But I disagree. Carl played 11 seasons at the highest level of his sport. Not many players do that. He had not played in the minor leagues before coming to the majors, and had performed very well at a very young age. Anyone who makes a major league is one of the top players in the sport, and Carl played at that level for over a decade. So no, Carl was not a hall-of-famer, or a World Series winner, or an All-Star, but he was a solid performer for many years, who did some remarkable things, some of which I will talk about in a few minutes.

So, why is Carl Scheib’s career important? I’ll give you eight reasons:

  1. Connie Mack — Connie Mack was involved with the Philadelphia A’s from their beginning, and spent over 50 years in baseball from the late 1800s into the 1950s. His teams in the early 20th century were the “Yankees” before the Yankees became good. Carl was signed and managed by Connie Mack, one of the all-time greats. So, Carl’s career, thanks to Mack, bridges all the way back to the early days of major league baseball, and carries into the golden era.
  2. World War II — Many players got their opportunities to play thanks to a lot of the players entering the service. Carl was someone who benefited from this situation. This is an interesting era in baseball history, which has been studied quite a bit. Quite a few of these players were older and were called up from the minors to play. Many of their careers ended when the boys came home. Carl was not one of them. He stuck — and got better when the best players were back.
  3. A’s last pennant race — The A’s were in Philadelphia until the late 1950s, when they moved to Kansas City and then onto Oakland. We now know them as the Oakland A’s and many can remember the great teams of the 1970s. But the Kansas City A’s never were in the pennant race, so it was the 1948 A’s of Philadelphia, who last challenged for the lead. This team was in first place as late as August, with Carl as one of their star pitchers having his best season. Even after the A’s faded, Carl continued to pitch well as the Indians, Red Sox, and Yankees battled for the championship. The last week of the season, Carl beat the Yankees, denying them the pennant, allowing the Indians to win. Under pressure, Carl was brilliant, and was somewhat of a Yankee-killer at that time.
  4. Integration — Carl played through the era when baseball became integrated — when Jackie Robinson entered the National League, and Larry Doby entered the American League. Carl faced Doby on a number of occasions, and usually didn’t do too well against him. The A’s hired a heckler to harass Doby when he was in Philadelphia. Some of it was good-natured, but a lot of it was shameful and mean. In fact, Carl related in the book that the other players were hard on the African-American players, treating them very badly. Carl felt sorry for them.
  5. All-Time Greats — Carl got to meet some of the all-time great ballplayers.  He was coached by Chief Bender, and Al Simmons. He also met Babe Ruth during Connie Mack’s celebration of 50 years in baseball. So, Carl interacted with some of the greatest old-time ballplayers.
  6. Opponents — Carl played against some of the greatest players of all time during baseball’s golden era, and often got the better of them. He faced Ted Williams, Joe Dimaggio, Yogi Berra, Larry Doby, Mickey Mantle, and many more. On the mound, his opponents were Satchel Paige, Bob Feller, Bob Lemon, Hal Newhouser, and others.
  7. Did Great Things — Carl threw complete game shutouts, hit a grand slam against the White Sox, hit four other major league homeruns, had many clutch wins and saves, and even clutch hits as a batter.
  8. Good hitter — Carl was a good-hitting pitcher. He could have been an outfielder, and played in the outfield in a couple games. He was also a key pinch hitter. One year he hit .396 — in over 50 at bats — in the major leagues.  This is tough to do! He was a lifetime .250 hitter. One game in particular made me laugh. It was really remarkable. Carl was pitching a complete game. It was tied into the bottom of the 9th. With a couple men on base, guess who came up to bat — Carl. Now, these days, how likely is it that a manager is going to allow the pitcher to bat in the bottom of the 9th of a tie game. This doesn’t happen anymore!  Ever!  So, Carl is allowed to bat, and what does he do? He gets the game-winning walk-off hit!  I looked into this a little bit, and I don’t know of any other instances where a starting pitcher, throwing a complete game, has the walk-off hit to end the game. It certainly hasn’t happened in quite awhile, if at all.  Admittedly, I didn’t look too hard, but it is remarkable nonetheless.  In another game, in the minor leagues, near the end of his career, the manager was thrown out of the game for some reason, and Carl being one of the older players on the team, was asked to manage the rest of the way.  Along comes the bottom of the 9th, and the game is tied. There are a couple of men on. Guess who Carl, the manager, inserts as a pinch-hitter? Himself! And, guess what he did? He got a hit – a walk-off hit to win the game.

So, in summary, Carl was simply a great country ballplayer. On better teams, or with better management, or modern technology, I am sure he would have had an even better, and perhaps longer career. Carl truly was and is the “Wonder Boy” from Gratz!

Thank you ….

“Hass” Hassenger then spoke for a few minutes. He is the only other surviving member from the Gratz HS championship teams. He reminisced about the old days when they were boys playing ball in the valley.

Carl Scheib then answered questions and told jokes and stories for about 45 minutes.

(The entire program was recorded on video by The Gratz Historical Society and is available on DVD from them.)

Copies of the book Wonder Boy, and all other Sunbury Press books can be purchased wherever books are sold. A few signed copies will be offered by The Gratz Historical Society while supplies last. The book can also be purchased directly from Sunbury Press at:

http://www.sunburypressstore.com/Wonder-Boy-The-Story-of-Carl-Scheib-9781620064139.htm