The Joes go Ivy League — appear at Princeton University

Princeton, NJ — Joe Farrell and Joe Farley, collectively known as “The Joes,” the authors of the Keystone Tombstones and Gotham Graves series of biographical histories were in Princeton, NJ on Tuesday May 16th, 2017, researching their upcoming book about the Founders, in preparation for the 250th anniversary of the birth of the USA. Seen here before the statue of patriot John Witherspoon, on the grounds of Princeton University, the two said a few words before those gathered (a huuuuuuge crowd of 1 — the photographer). The pair had been to Witherspoon’s grave in the Princeton Cemetery, very near the graves of patriot Aaron Burr, president Grover Cleveland, and novelist John O’Hara.

Also planned is a special edition entitled Murder, Massacres, and Mayhem in the Mid-Atlantic, for which they visited the graves of Kitty and Jose Menendez.

The Joes are always looking for speaking engagements, providing a humorous and informative program about interesting people and their life stories. Contact us for more information at thejoes@keystonetombstones.com.

The Rising Popularity of Memoirs: Could Your Journal Become a Memoir?

by Emma Crosby

msayocac_fcMemoirs are continuing to increase in popularity amongst the book-purchasing public. In fact, Mark Singel’s memoir, a Year of Change and Consequences became the Sunbury Press Bestseller for November 2016. As interest in pop culture and the cult of celebrity continues to fascinate, it stands to reason that the memoirs of the famous and other public figures will attract mainstream attention. But it is not just the memoirs of the famous that have the potential to hold attention: the personal nature of written memoirs appeals to the natural voyeur inside most of us, and if you have an interesting story to tell, and are prepared to share your first person perspective and insights with a plethora of hungry strangers then it is likely that you will find an audience that want to discover that story. America craves confessionals, and the written memoir appeals to this desire, making it a market that is ripe for would-be writers to explore and make their mark.

Why Are Memoirs so Popular?

We live in a society where conspiracy theories abound, where scandals break in the mass media on a daily basis, and where there is a constant undercurrent that the American public is being lied to: the raw honesty of memoir serves to counterbalance this, and it is thought that this is why the market is growing at such a rapid rate. Ironically, the demand for memoir has become so great, that many novelists are now positioning their fiction to appear as memoir in order to capture an already captivated audience (thus infiltrating a market built on honesty with the perception of unintentional dishonesty) making those producing genuine memoirs in even greater demand.

Making a Memoir

tjcl_fcThe key to writing a good memoir is that it must be authentic and that it must be true: true to your story, true to your voice, and to where you have come from. Memoir enthusiasts can generally tell the difference between a story that is being told in truth and one that is being exaggerated, and for that market a simple truth will always be more appealing that a convoluted lie. Many memoirs begin life as journals that were never necessarily intended to be read by others, which is an interesting dimension shift. Memoirs that begin life in this way often have a raw realism that appeals to the audiences desire for true confessionals: to become a part of someone else’s reality. There are many benefits of writing a journal, besides the potential to turn that journal into a memoir and step onto the path towards fame and fortune.

Journal writing can be a cathartic experience and is often chosen by teens and young adults as a way to express themselves and deal with the confusion of growing up. Other groups use the cathartic nature of journaling, and well as its emotional disengagement, to help them process their thoughts and feelings: individuals in recovery from drug or alcohol abuse, for example, as well as those building a new life away from abusive or damaging relationships. Whilst your journal is unlikely to be publishable in its current form, a journal can be a very useful base for a memoir as reading it can help to jog your memory about your thoughts, feelings and experiences, as well as providing a useful timeline of events for you to continue to refer back to. Journal writing is also a useful way to hone your writing skills and to find your own unique voice: it is recommended as best practice for all would-be writers who have visions of creating their own memoir or other non-fiction work.

As publishers of memoir we have a unique insight into both how and why its authors choose to tell their stories, as well as into what the memoir reading public are looking for from their next bestseller. Memoir is about connections: the reader connects with the writer by understanding their story, building empathy for them, feeling that they have entered their world. In a society where are lives are so busy, and these connections are often left unmade in the wider community, these hair thin bonds become stronger and more important than ever.

Carl Scheib rips walk-off hit against Satchel Paige, hurls complete game — June 28, 1953

17

Carl Scheib with a bat

PHILADELPHIA, PA – Sunday June 28, 1953 — Jimmy Dykes’ A’s won in dramatic fashion this afternoon, carried by the arm and bat of Carl Scheib. The Gratz, PA native was embroiled in a pitchers’ duel with rookie Mike Blyzka of the St. Louis Browns. The two hurlers exchanged zeros through the 6th inning. The Browns took the lead in the 7th on a suicide squeeze bunt by Jim Dyck, plating Clint Courtney, who had tripled. The A’s evened things up in the bottom of the 8th. Dave Philley singled and went to third on Pete Suder’s knock. Eddie Robinson then drove Philley home on a sacrifice fly. Scheib retired three power-hitting Browns in order in the 9th on fly balls — Dick Kokos, Roy Sievers, and Vic Wertz. Blyzka then took his turn in the bottom of the 9th and retired the first two batters on grounders — Loren Babe and Ed McGhee. However, Joe Astroth ripped a triple to the scoreboard, putting the winning run on third with two outs. Browns manager Marty Marion visited the mound and summoned his closer, Satchel Paige, from the bullpen to face the next batter, pitcher Carl Scheib. Known as a good-hitting pitcher, the 6’1″ Pennsylvania Dutchman stepped in against the veteran former Negro League star, who would go on to the Hall of Fame.  “Ole Satch” fired two strikes past Scheib, but Carl got a hold of the next one, ripping it to the wall in center field to score Astroth for the winning run.  The A’s won 2 to 1. Carl Scheib was the winner, pitching a complete game, yielding only four hits, no walks, and one earned run while striking out three.  It was Carl Scheib’s last win in the major leagues.

For more details about Carl Scheib, see his new biography: Wonder Boy – The Story of Carl Scheib: The Youngest Player in American League History.

Wonder Boy – The Story of Carl Scheib
Authored by Lawrence Knorr
wb_fcList Price: $24.95
Hardcover: 240 pages
Publisher: Sunbury Press, Inc. (May 26, 2016)
Language: English
ISBN-10: 1620064138
ISBN-13: 978-1620064139
Product Dimensions: 6 x 0.7 x 9 inches
SPO003030 SPORTS & RECREATION / Baseball / History
BIO016000 BIOGRAPHY & AUTOBIOGRAPHY / Sports
HIS036080 HISTORY / United States / State & Local / Middle Atlantic

For more information, please see:
http://www.sunburypressstore.com/Wonder-Boy-The-Story-of-…

Tom the Innkeeper from "Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban" plays Terry in "The Cursed Man" movie

Sunbury Press: When you came into The Cursed Man movie, you’d already been in a very popular movie. Can you tell everyone what movie that is?

headshot3 edited without bowJim Tavare:  My biggest movie role to date was Tom the Innkeeper in Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban but maybe The Cursed Man will change all that!  The Potter franchise has been very good to me despite being on screen for a mere 5 minutes. My kids went to all the after parties and met Snape and Dumbledore, I still sign at Harry Potter conventions all over the world and the royalties come in handy too!

SP: You play the role of ‘Terry’ in The Cursed Man movie. Can you tell us a little about the character?

JT: Terry is the janitor of the hospital. He fights hard to preserve the status quo of the institution he has worked in for many years but things change when the Cursed Man is admitted….

SP: You have a very successful career outside of acting. Can you tell everyone what you do?

JT:  When I first left drama school (RADA) I found the idea of waiting around for the phone to ring a little soul destroying so I embarked on a long stand-up comedy career culminating in my own TV series on BBC and a finalist spot on Last Comic Standing in the US. I’ve since built fans stateside and am able to eke out a pretty good living because acting can be a fickle mistress. I have played in the front of HM the Queen on several occasions and even briefly acquired a reputation as Prince Charles’ favourite comic.

SP: Producer Jim Perry just announced the release date as being October 31st … Halloween night, 2016 at the Alex Theater in Glendale, CA. Can we expect to see you there and what do you think of the venue?

JT: I will most certainly be there because I live right around the corner!  I’m excited because I have two films for release on Halloween.

SP: I know people are curious how comedians come up with material. How do you develop material to present to audiences?

JT: A lot of my material comes from my everyday experiences. I found when I moved to the US I found an entirely new angle of being the Englishman abroad and this led to a considerable amount of material. I use music in my act to punctuate my comedy. Think I’m the only comic in the world who does stand-up with an upright bass.

SP: Can you tell us what it was like to be on the set of Harry Potter, how well the costume fit and whether or not you got to keep it?

JT: My costume was fun to wear and I was in make-up about 3 hours in make each day.  When I first joined the cast Alfonso Cuaron told me his favourite movie was the The Young Frankenstein. I said “Hey – mine too!”
He said “Then just do Igor!”
That is where my huge hump came from.
I got to keep one or two of my costume items form the set – namely my prosthetic ears but they disintegrated after about 3 months. I also got to keep the silver garters that held my shirt sleeves up although I think my kids have them now.

SP: What is it like behind the scenes when filming a feature?


JT: Waiting, waiting and more waiting…
Stand-up comedy is way more solitary than acting but in a movie it’s fun being part of a team and a piece of the jigsaw that completes the story. I really like to collaborate with actors, writers and directors. Acting in film is very technical too and you never stop learning from other people.

SP: Did you find anything ‘special’ about the character of Terry you played in The Cursed Man movie?

JT: I always try to find some common ground between me and the character I’m playing. I try and make it interesting, however small the role. Acting is about making interesting choices.

SP: Please tell everyone what you are up to and where they can find out more about you and follow your career.

JT: I have a number of movies in production right now including a nice role in I Spit On Your Grave: Deja Vu and I’m currently working with Grammy Award winning singer Shelby Lynne on her movie The Magnificent Room. I’m always touring my comedy around the world. New tour dates can be found at jimtavare.org  or there’s always Twitter….

About the Premiere:
World Premiere of THE CURSED MAN movie – Alex Theatre in Glendale, CA. Halloween Night October 31, 2016 – 7pm to 11pm – Party before and after. This may be the greatest movie premiere on Halloween Night in the History of the Alex Theatre.  For more information about the venue, please see: http://www.alextheatre.org/

tcm_fc newAbout the Book:
Alister Kunkle believes death is in love with him.  A simple smile from friend or stranger is all it takes to encourage death to kill.

With his family deceased and a path of destruction behind him, Alister sits inside a mental institution, sworn to silence and separated from the rest of the world, haunted by his inability to escape death’s preferential treatment.

But when a beautiful psychologist arrives at the institution and starts offering him care, Alister braces himself for more killings. When none follow, he tries to figure out whether he truly is insane or if death has finally come to him in the form of a woman.

About the Author:
Keith Rommel is an award-winning author of ten novels and is an award-winning screenwriter. His writing has been called, “Horror for the curious mind.” His first two novels, The Cursed Man and The Lurking Man are at various stages of production to become motion pictures. 2016.

The Cursed Man
Authored by Keith Rommel
List Price: $14.95
5″ x 8″ (12.7 x 20.32 cm)
Black & White on White paper
222 pages
Sunbury Press, Inc.
ISBN-13: 978-1620063682
ISBN-10: 1620063689
BISAC: Fiction / Thrillers

About The Cursed Man Movie (2016):

MV5BMTQzNDYxNjkyMF5BMl5BanBnXkFtZTgwNDE2MDUxMjE@._V1_UY268_CR6,0,182,268_AL_Alister Kunkle believes death is in love with him. A simple smile from friend or stranger is all it takes to encourage death to kill.

Director: James L. Perry

Stars: Brahm Gallagher, Brinna LockeMaritza Brikisak

The special edition movie premiere cover are only available through October.
For more information about the novel, please see:
http://www.sunburypressstore.com/The-Cursed-Man-PAPERBACK…

For more information about the movie, please see:

http://www.imdb.com/title/tt2614902/combined

For more information about Keith Rommel, please see:

http://keithrommel.weebly.com/

"Supernatural" star Ruth Connell plays Bonnie in "The Cursed Man"

Sunbury Press: Soon after you completed the filming of The Cursed Man, you had something major happen to you and your career. Can you please tell everyone what that is?

ConnellRuth Connell: Um well…I landed the role of “Rowena” in Supernatural which has completely changed my life and for the better!

SP: You play the role of Bonnie in The Cursed Man movie. Can you tell people who Bonnie is and what her role is in the movie?

RC: I liked the name Bonnie when I got cast as it sounds a bit Scottish already. I thought she was an interesting person to play in that she is a receptionist at the lets say the ‘dodgy’ Hospital and I could see there was scope to color her in creatively. These ‘smaller’ characters can have nuggets of joy within them – there is a freedom to test ideas when you don’t have as much plot responsibility.

SP: In the filming of either Supernatural or The Cursed Man, have you had anything on set that really stands out in your mind?

RC: I really liked James the Director of The Cursed Man and remember his wife catering for all of us when we were shooting in his house  – that was really touching. That and hanging out a bit with Jim Tavare and my new wee pal Ian Watson. The whole cast and crew were really open and friendly which is to be applauded and wished for on every set – Supernatural is the same and it makes all the difference in the world.

SP: If you had to place The Cursed Man into a specific genre, what would that be?

RC: I think it’s a law unto itself!

SP: What is it like to see yourself on television and on the big screen? Do you find yourself critical of your performance?

RC: Yup! Sometimes it’s useful to see where the work needs to go further. Mostly it’s hard not to hate on your own face blown up large and detailed!

SP: Do you have any big surprises coming up in the near future that you can mention to your fans?

RC: Well I already came back to life on Supernatural – that was a tricky spoiler to keep to myself for so long in front of so many people especially at the conventions with the fans.

SP: What do you find appealing about The Cursed Man? If anything, why do you think readers should give it a read before the movie comes out?

RC: I really enjoyed reading the book – if you like Supernatural and some of the themes of death and the devil, there is plenty for you in The Cursed Man.

SP: If you have any closing comments, the floor is yours.

RC: Ah – its been a pleasure to meet and work with the lovely people involved in The Cursed Man. Well done to Jim for getting it made and to Keith for writing it in the first place!

About the Premiere:
World Premiere of THE CURSED MAN movie – Alex Theatre in Glendale, CA. Halloween Night October 31, 2016 – 7pm to 11pm – Party before and after. This may be the greatest movie premiere on Halloween Night in the History of the Alex Theatre.  For more information about the venue, please see: http://www.alextheatre.org/

tcm_fc newAbout the Book:
Alister Kunkle believes death is in love with him.  A simple smile from friend or stranger is all it takes to encourage death to kill.

With his family deceased and a path of destruction behind him, Alister sits inside a mental institution, sworn to silence and separated from the rest of the world, haunted by his inability to escape death’s preferential treatment.

But when a beautiful psychologist arrives at the institution and starts offering him care, Alister braces himself for more killings. When none follow, he tries to figure out whether he truly is insane or if death has finally come to him in the form of a woman.

About the Author:
Keith Rommel is an award-winning author of ten novels and is an award-winning screenwriter. His writing has been called, “Horror for the curious mind.” His first two novels, The Cursed Man and The Lurking Man are at various stages of production to become motion pictures. 2016.

The Cursed Man
Authored by Keith Rommel
List Price: $14.95
5″ x 8″ (12.7 x 20.32 cm)
Black & White on White paper
222 pages
Sunbury Press, Inc.
ISBN-13: 978-1620063682
ISBN-10: 1620063689
BISAC: Fiction / Thrillers

About The Cursed Man Movie (2016):

MV5BMTQzNDYxNjkyMF5BMl5BanBnXkFtZTgwNDE2MDUxMjE@._V1_UY268_CR6,0,182,268_AL_Alister Kunkle believes death is in love with him. A simple smile from friend or stranger is all it takes to encourage death to kill.

Director: James L. Perry

Stars: Brahm Gallagher, Brinna LockeMaritza Brikisak

The special edition movie premiere cover are only available through October.
For more information about the novel, please see:
http://www.sunburypressstore.com/The-Cursed-Man-PAPERBACK…

For more information about the movie, please see:

http://www.imdb.com/title/tt2614902/combined

For more information about Keith Rommel, please see:

http://keithrommel.weebly.com/

Chilean actress Maritza Brikisak, of “The Cursed Man,” interviewed by Sunbury Press

Sunbury Press: Sunbury Press: Can you tell the reading audience who you play in The Cursed Man movie and how you approached preparing yourself in bringing the character to the big screen?

MBMaritza Brikisak: I’ll try to answer this and all the other questions without giving too much information away, I don’t want to spoil all the amazing surprises The Cursed Man is bringing to the screen. I play two characters, Alister’s Mom and Death. One challenge for me was to make my two characters distinctive enough and for ‘Death’ to feel more human than supernatural. So my approach was to make the ‘monster’ makeup subtle so not to lose the human connection I wanted to have between the two characters.

SP: Filming can be chaotic. Please share with us one of the funniest moments in the filming process, if there was one.

MB: Nothing specific comes to mind. The set was friendly and pleasant but like you indicated, the hectic schedule didn’t allow for blooper moments.

SP: If you had to pick a favorite thing about the character that you played, what would that be?

MB: I seem to enjoy playing ‘monsters’ a lot more than playing humans ☺ I think that’s because of all the makeup and the character transformation that comes with that type of role. I find it very liberating. You can be big, very expressive and loud while portraying the life of the character. When playing ‘human’ all emotions need to be contained and controlled. I applied for the role of ‘Death’ when I auditioned for the film. I was surprised when I learned later that I’ll also be playing ‘Alister’s mom’.

SP: Please tell the reading audience what you are up to now and what is coming down the pike.

MB: I am fortunate I am always working. I just finished playing ‘Juana’ in Felix Martiz’s short film ‘Kiko’, about a family broken up by immigration. I am currently working on the web series ‘True Passage’ in Michigan which is bringing awareness to the Foster Care Program; I filmed two episodes and am returning in May to continue. I am also working on my own film The Lurking Man. I play the lead role of ‘Cailean’, an abusive alcoholic mother who is given a chance at redemption if she accepts the job of ‘Death’. Based on the Novel by Keith Rommel of the same name. Keith and I wrote the original screenplay and was awarded first prize at the Zed Festival, so we are starting with a strong foundation. We are aiming for a 2017 release.

SP: If there was anything you had to say to someone reading this interview about The Cursed Man, what would that be?

MB: I am very excited to see it. Making a feature is a long process. It takes years. I can’t wait to see what Jim Perry (producer/director) has created. We caught glances here and there and it looks amazing!

SP: You have been in the business a long time and have played many characters in many movies. If people wanted to learn more about you, where can they go to gain that information?

MB: All my life and work is on my website at www.maritzaweb.com it has links to everything including my personal FB and IMDb (www.imdb.me/maritza). I am reachable and findable as well.

SP: What do you find appealing about The Cursed Man?

MB: I am a huge fan of psychological thrillers a la ‘Sixth Sense’, The Cursed Man is that type of film. A good solid story, with only enough special effects to create the fantasy and good characters played by wonderful actors … I am in great company!

SP: We’re giving you the floor. Is there anything you’d like to let readers know about yourself or anything else?

MB: Always follow your dreams, and like what you do. Happiness is inevitable that way.☺

About the Premiere:
World Premiere of THE CURSED MAN movie – Alex Theatre in Glendale, CA. Halloween Night October 31, 2016 – 7pm to 11pm – Party before and after. This may be the greatest movie premiere on Halloween Night in the History of the Alex Theatre.  For more information about the venue, please see: http://www.alextheatre.org/

tcm_fc newAbout the Book:
Alister Kunkle believes death is in love with him.  A simple smile from friend or stranger is all it takes to encourage death to kill.

With his family deceased and a path of destruction behind him, Alister sits inside a mental institution, sworn to silence and separated from the rest of the world, haunted by his inability to escape death’s preferential treatment.

But when a beautiful psychologist arrives at the institution and starts offering him care, Alister braces himself for more killings. When none follow, he tries to figure out whether he truly is insane or if death has finally come to him in the form of a woman.

About the Author:
Keith Rommel is an award-winning author of ten novels and is an award-winning screenwriter. His writing has been called, “Horror for the curious mind.” His first two novels, The Cursed Man and The Lurking Man are at various stages of production to become motion pictures. 2016.

The Cursed Man
Authored by Keith Rommel
List Price: $14.95
5″ x 8″ (12.7 x 20.32 cm)
Black & White on White paper
222 pages
Sunbury Press, Inc.
ISBN-13: 978-1620063682
ISBN-10: 1620063689
BISAC: Fiction / Thrillers

About The Cursed Man Movie (2016):

MV5BMTQzNDYxNjkyMF5BMl5BanBnXkFtZTgwNDE2MDUxMjE@._V1_UY268_CR6,0,182,268_AL_Alister Kunkle believes death is in love with him. A simple smile from friend or stranger is all it takes to encourage death to kill.

Director: James L. Perry

Stars: Brahm Gallagher, Brinna LockeMaritza Brikisak

The special edition movie premiere cover are only available through October.
For more information about the novel, please see:
http://www.sunburypressstore.com/The-Cursed-Man-PAPERBACK…

For more information about the movie, please see:

http://www.imdb.com/title/tt2614902/combined

For more information about Keith Rommel, please see:

http://keithrommel.weebly.com/

Young actress Paris Bravo, of "The Cursed Man," interviewed by Sunbury Press

Sunbury Press: You started your career at a very young age and have many talents. Can you share some of the talents you apply to your blossoming career in movies, commercials, and your  everyday life?

Paris Bravo

Paris Bravo

Paris Bravo: Martial Arts, Weapons, Stunt work and Dancing have been crucial to being successful in this industry. I have booked many jobs with those skill sets. My parents have made me very well-rounded by playing several sports like: basketball, soccer, softball, flag football and CHEER. I am also learning guitar, cello and piano. Being an athlete has helped me in my everyday life by being focused, fit and has made it easier to work on roles that require a ton of energy.

SP: The Cursed Man movie is a psychological suspense thriller with some horror elements. How did you feel about playing in a film of a dark nature?

PB:  At the time I had never worked on a dark theatrical role. It was a new challenge and has helped me in obtaining other roles. I thought it was pretty cool to be a part of such an amazing role…especially a novel turning into a movie. Some of the scenes were pretty scary for a kid but I could not wait to find what would happen in the next scene.

SP: In preparing for your role as Michael’s daughter (Ian Watson), what sort of preparation did you have to go through to understand the character you were playing?

PB:  I prepared for the role by reading the book with my parents to learn the acting style/genre. I also worked with Ian Watson to get a feel for him as my dad. I also envisioned something happening to my parents to make the role more believable.

SP: Do your parents help you in anyway in giving you advice in ‘how’ they think you should approach the way you act or portray certain characters?

PB: Yes, my parents help me a ton. We run lines and we all give our opinions. We all become the characters and pick the scene a part. On occasion I have had to hire an acting coach to assist and guide me in the right direction of what the Director is looking for.

SP: What is the most memorable moment for you in the filming of The Cursed Man?

PB: The most memorable moment for me was when “Duppy/Dr.Anna Lee began to choke my “Mom” in a scene. At first it really scared me, it was so intense. Then they were all done and everyone was laughing.

SP: If fans wanted to connect and follow you, please let them know how and where they need to go.

PB:  I have social media accounts: Instagram: ParisBravoOfficial  | Twitter: @BravoParis | FB: Paris Bravo |  Musical.ly: parisbravoninja

SP: The premiere is taking place at the Alex Theater in Glendale, CA. The theater is large and seats 2,500 people. What are your thoughts on the location of the premiere, the capacity and the idea that it is taking place on Halloween night?

PB:  Having it on Halloween Night will make it even more COOL! This movie is dark and scary, PERFECT for Halloween. The location is beautiful and I cant wait to see the final product.  I hope to see Mr. Rommel there. I was born in Orlando, FL and moved to Los Angeles at age 7 1/2 to follow my dreams. I am excited for the premier. Do we come dressed up in fancy clothes or shall we come in masquerade?

SP: Out of all the special talents you have, pick the one talent that you think expresses who you are as a person the most.

PB:   I think that Martial Arts is the one talent expresses who I am the most as I am strong, confident, respectful, communicate well, I am dedicated, I persevere and learn multiple steps very easy. Martial arts helps keep up my competitive edge.

About the Premiere:
World Premiere of THE CURSED MAN movie – Alex Theatre in Glendale, CA. Halloween Night October 31, 2016 – 7pm to 11pm – Party before and after. This may be the greatest movie premiere on Halloween Night in the History of the Alex Theatre.  For more information about the venue, please see: http://www.alextheatre.org/

tcm_fc newAbout the Book:
Alister Kunkle believes death is in love with him.  A simple smile from friend or stranger is all it takes to encourage death to kill.

With his family deceased and a path of destruction behind him, Alister sits inside a mental institution, sworn to silence and separated from the rest of the world, haunted by his inability to escape death’s preferential treatment.

But when a beautiful psychologist arrives at the institution and starts offering him care, Alister braces himself for more killings. When none follow, he tries to figure out whether he truly is insane or if death has finally come to him in the form of a woman.

About the Author:
Keith Rommel is an award-winning author of ten novels and is an award-winning screenwriter. His writing has been called, “Horror for the curious mind.” His first two novels, The Cursed Man and The Lurking Man are at various stages of production to become motion pictures. 2016.

The Cursed Man
Authored by Keith Rommel
List Price: $14.95
5″ x 8″ (12.7 x 20.32 cm)
Black & White on White paper
222 pages
Sunbury Press, Inc.
ISBN-13: 978-1620063682
ISBN-10: 1620063689
BISAC: Fiction / Thrillers

About The Cursed Man Movie (2016):

MV5BMTQzNDYxNjkyMF5BMl5BanBnXkFtZTgwNDE2MDUxMjE@._V1_UY268_CR6,0,182,268_AL_Alister Kunkle believes death is in love with him. A simple smile from friend or stranger is all it takes to encourage death to kill.

Director: James L. Perry

Stars: Brahm Gallagher, Brinna Locke,Maritza Brikisak

The special edition movie premiere cover are only available through October.
For more information about the novel, please see:
http://www.sunburypressstore.com/The-Cursed-Man-PAPERBACK…

For more information about the movie, please see:

http://www.imdb.com/title/tt2614902/combined

For more information about Keith Rommel, please see:

http://keithrommel.weebly.com/

''Cli-Fi'' Ruminations Pose Philosophical and Literary Questions About the Purpose and Direction of Cli-Fi Genre

INTRO:

IMG_20140518_201141[1]On Twitter, Cli-fi theorist Dan Bloom has shared many of his cli-fi musings, and compiled a list of them to share with other people — mostly intended, he says, for potential or would-be cli-fi novelists, academics studying the emergence of the genre, reporters researching news story about the rising genre and of course, current cli-fi writers themselves. And, he points out, readers of cli-fi, too.

You can find his list of some of his cli-fi thoughts on a blog here. We recently asked Bloom, who is not a novelist or a literary critic, why he sat down to write these thoughts down and how he did it, and who he had in mind when he wrote them down. He was kind enough to reply in a few emails to explain his zen-like ”cli-fi ruminations.”

QUESTION: So, Dan, what’s this all about? You’re not an academic, you don’t have a PhD, you’re not a literary theorist or a literary critic or a novelist, so what were you driving at in writing these thoughts down? And how did you do it?

DAN BLOOM: I wanted to gather my thoughts about what direction I felt cli-fi is going in, should go in, might go in in the future, and its philosophical and literary meanings. So using the 140 chararacter limit of the usual Twitter post, in order to keep my thoughts concise and brief — and readable, without being verbose — I sat down on my bed in my spare time, and lying on my back with my head propped up on a pillow, I merely jotted down on my cellphone screen shorts Tweets either late at night or early in the morning. I was just thinking to myself, and thought the ideas might be useful to writers, critics, academics, literary theorists, PhD scholars, book reviewers and readers.

QUESTION: And what do you hope the publication of these ideas might do?

DAN BLOOM: I wrote them down with no real purpose or intention, other than to try my hand at putting my thoughts down on paper (on screen, that is) and to see if anybody out there in readerland or writerland or academia or the literary criticism or book reviewer world might find some of the “cli-fi ruminations” useful or food for thought. That’s all. I mostly wrote them down for myself, though, to think out loud to myself and for myself, and to try to clarify in my own mind what cli-fi is all about now and might be about in the future. I really didn’t have any real purpose in mind, just to use the Twitter format to keep things neat and concise. And, I found out, as I began writing them down, about ten or twelve at every sitting, that the ideas were interesting and provocative to me, if nobody else. So I found the exercise, the thought experiment, useful for me, first of all. If anyone else gets anything out of them, great. I really just wanted to experiment with a short concise form to write down some ideas I have about the direction of cli-fi and its future.

QUESTION: So, then, which ones did you like best and which ones didn’t you like so much, after you wrote them down?

DAN BLOOM: Good question. In fact, I wrote them all down, without thinking of which ones “worked” or which ones didn’t. I just wanted to make a record and then see later on if it added up to anything. So yes, some of the ruminations work very well, and some don’t work as well, too, and I decided in the end, that in fact, it’s up to each reader to decide which of these ruminnations work for them, and which ones don’t. I didn’t edit myself, and I just let the thoughts come out, almost like writing poetry. The ideas just came out of my mind as I began typing. I am now writing about ten a day, and I plan to compile 100 or 500 or 1000 eventually. But I will be happy to reach 100.

QUESTION: Can you give us some examples of which ones you like best?

DAN BLOOM: Well, I like them  all, of course, They are just a record of my thoughts as I jotted them down. But on looking at them later, I do see that some of them are more positive and inspiritng and even motivational than some of the others, which might seem dystopian or apocalyptic to other people. So I feel that it’s up to each reader to take the ruminations and check off the ones they like and the ones they don’t like so much. To five you an example, below I will mark in BLUE those ruminations I like best because I feel they might be useful to literary critics and writers and readers who want to understand what cli-fi is. And every reader will have different choices. I think that is what is most interesting about this thought exercise. Everyone will have different reactions. So here they are:

​• Cli-fi isn’t a marketing term or a bookstore shelving category, and it’s more than a literary term. It’s a password into the future and those who know it, know.

  • ​Cli-fi is more than a genre term, much more than that: it’s a code word, a password, a secret handshake; it is bringing us together as one
  • ​ Cli-Fi is not for you or your children or grandkids, no. It’s codeword for future generations, as yet unborn. And born they shall be. In next 30 generations.​
  • Cli-Fi cannot, will not, save us from what’s coming. Too late for that. But it’s here, now, always. We have 30 generations to prepare. See?
  • In the future, come 30 more generations of man, there will be no Cli-Fi. By 2500 A.D. (Anthrocenus Deflexus) it will be too late.
  • People want cli-fi to offer solutions, comfortable happy fixes. Aint gonna happen. We are ”doomed, doomed” as a species, and we did it to ourselves.

​• Cli-Fi cannot, will not, save us from what’s coming. Too late for that. But it’s here, now, always. We have 30 generations to prepare. There’s time.

​• Cli-fi won’t make much of a difference either way you define it. It’s just here, now, beckoning future writers. It’s not sci-fi, never was

  • Cli-fi is more than a mere genre: it’s a cri de coeur, a warning flare, a pathway to the future before it’s too late. See? #CliFi’s here now​
  • If the rising new literary term “cli-fi” makes you ‘cringe’ at first sight or hearing, don’t give up on it yet. With time, you will come to see it for what it is.
  • ​ Cli-fi is not sci-fi, it is not eco-fiction, it is not subgenred to anything earlier. #CliFi is a hashtag burning its stamp into our very skin, as we prepare.
  • ​Cli-fi is more than a genre term, much more than that: it’s a code word, a password, a secret handshake; it is bringing us together as one.
  • Cli-fi wasn’t just a case of slapping a new name on an old genre. It’s much deeper and existential than that. Think game-changer, new directions.
  • We’ll never make it out of here alive. That’s cli-fi in a nutshell. Man the lifeboats, prepare to test the seas of one season after the next.
  • Cli-fi defines a line the sands of time that no man can cross without trepidation or reverence. There’s a reason we are here. What is it?
  • If cli-fi is one thing, it’s a chance to choose our future. One door leads here, another door leads there. Choose wisely: Your descendants are waiting.
  • There’s a tragic flaw in our genes, a selfish shellfish that doesn’t want to share. This DNA will be our downfall. This Earth shall abide.
  • Cli-fi doesn’t choose sides. We do. Choose your weapon, use it wisely. We are here by the grace of God, and someday we won’t be. God knows.
  • You could say that in a post-sci-fi world, cli-fi has come to rescue us from oblivion. Not true. No way.
  • You might not really be interested in cli-fi, or where it is going. But trust me, cli-fi is interested in you. Why? Becos the End is nigh
  • When all is said and done, cli-fi points in only one direction. It’s for everyone to find it on their own. ON THE BEACH from 1957 has clues.
  • Cli-fi is not about who coined it or who popularized it. It’s about much more pressing things, like how many more generations before the End?
  • I never met a future I didn’t like. No, that can’t be true. Some futures spell the end of humankind. It’s in the cards. Choose your exit.
  • Cli-fi is neither pro nor con. It just is. Take your pick. Choose yr sides. We are at war w/ a future that threatens all futures. Arise!
  • Cli-fi is so much a part of this world that on first hearing the word or seeing it in print, it slips right by, invisble, unnoticed.
  • If by some remote chance you find yourself reading a cli-fi novel without realizing it’s cli-fi, you have arrived.
  • There are are still 30 generations to be born before the real apocalypse begins. This now is just a rehearsal. An audition.
  • Cli-fi leads to a meeting of the minds, borderless, rudderless, unconsolable. Will we get there on time?
  • If you think time is running out, or has already run out, in terms of the unspeakable cli-fi future we face, you are very close to solving the riddle. Why are we here?
  • I don’t want to sound pessimistic, as optimism must abound and console us. But listen to the wind, hear the chimes sing, ring.
  • Cli-fi has a place in our hearts and minds, now and forever. But forever is no longer forever. We sold the farm.
  • Cli-fi can, and will, shine a light on the darkness that is about to befall us. Let’s stick together and shoulder the burden.
  • You didn’t know cli-fi was coming. Nobody did. It’s taken us by surprise.
  • There will be days when cli-fi is beyond us, unscoutable, undetected. All the more reason to pay attention.
  • Cli-fi doesn’t mean resignation or giving in to the darkness ahead. To the contrary, it means taking up arms.
  • If a time shall come when all else fails, cli-fi may just come to the rescue. Make room.
  • Cli-fi cannot answer all our questions or undo the deeds we have done. No. But she can unburden us of our fears.
  • There will come a time when there is no time left. That’s where, and when, cli-fi comes in.
  • Who will write the cli-fi of the future? They will be legion, legends. Welcome them.
  • Cli-fi is more than a mere genre term, much more than a literary term. It’s a battle cry, a cri decoeur, a shout-out to future generations: “We tried to warn you!”
  • Think positive, think cli-fi. Think future generations, think now. Think the end is nigh unless we change our ways.
  • There is no way out of here, said the sailors to the sun. Thirty more generations is all we have left. What then?
  • Ploddingly, one step at a time, we are marching to future days. Cli-fi cannot stop the deluge, yet we must not surrender. Never.
  • With sea levels rising in future times, Nature has been turned on its head. Cli-fi paints a picture, sight unseen.
  • If we could see CO2, smell it, know that is there, over-loaded, we might be able to put out the fires. But it is invisible, odorless.
  • Whatever generation you belong to, know in your heart that there is no way out of here. Nature has spoken, Earth recoils. Write on.
  • To show respect to the Earth, which is our home in the cosmos, please always capitalize the word as ”Earth.” Earth matters, tell the copy desk. Lowercasing it is beneath us.
  • Cli-fi cannot, will not, lead the way. This is a clean-up action, and way too late. But it matters nevertheless.
  • One cannot see the future, cli-fi is blind. But the stories we tell will matter, even if it is all for naught.
  • Cli-fi, by indirection finds direction out. Your words on the page must be balanced, insistent. Always. And never lose hope.
  • Not doomed yet? What will it take to connect the dots? Not doomed yet? Some overly-rosy displays of optimism in print could be seen as pathological.
  • As humans, ike all life forms, we are hardwired and programmed to believe that the near future will be similar to the recent past. Our Achilles heel, so to speak.
  • Cli-fi won’t solve our problems, and can’t undo what’s done. Fasten your seatbelts. This is a ride to Hell.
  • Climate change is more than a fact of life. It is the result of human ingenuity, greed, rapaciousness and fear. Fear not: cli-fi is here. Write it.
  • I came to the table naive and unquestioning. I left totally convinced there will be dead people, lots of dead people. That was the genesis of cli-fi.
  • You might not want to go down the cli-fi road, and that’s okay. It’s not a pretty picture, not a happy selfie. It’s disaster, writ large.
  • In the long and rambling history of humankind, cli-fi will be just a blip on the radar screen. Pay it no heed.
  • You weren’t born yesterday. Your descendants may not even be born at all, ever.   That’s how unfathomable cli-fi is.
  • If you can manage to fit the personal stories of cli-fi between the covers of a book, do it. With trepidation. Know your audience.
  • Cli-fi will have no denouement, no act three, no happy ending, no Greek chorus, no social media take-away. Push send.
  • Sorry, but this is how cli-fi is going to be, in the Anthropocene. Just 12 letters spelling doom.
  • I wish there was some cli-fi way out of here, but there ain’t. Ain’t ain’t ain’t. Ain’t ain’t ain’t times, ten thousand times ain’t.
QUESTION: So in the end, what were  you driving at?
DAN BLOOM: You know, as this all unfolded, I had no idea what I was doing, nor did I want to know what I was doing. I just did it. They came to me, when I made in the evenings or in the early mornings. I hope they will prove useful to some people — maybe cli-fi novelists working now or in the future with the genre, or maybe readers or literary critics or academics writing papers about cli-fi for academic or research journals. I amost feel like this was a kind of automatic writing. I just wrote down what was in my mind, and one idea led to another, one by one. But not all of them “work.” But I will let others decide for themselves which ones work and which ones don’t. For them. For me, they all work. I was just sitting in bed jotting things down to myself.

Lee Harvey Oswald Innocent!

patsy_fc_2014Dallas, TX — Since the assassination of President John F. Kennedy, three theories have been forwaded as the involvement of Lee Harvey Oswald: that he was a lone assassin, as the Warren Commission claimed; that Oswald was a part of a vast, complex conspiracy to kill the sitting president, as those who reject the Warren report insist; and, finally, that Oswald was not involved, either singly or collectively, in what went down that day in Dallas. The greatest stumbling block to the latter has to do with hard, cold evidence: Not only was Oswald located on the sixth floor of the book depository that day; he absolutely carried a rifle with telescopic sight and fired it out the window. How could it be remotely possible, then, that Oswald was completely innocent as to JFK’s murder?

In his latest iconoclastic work, prolific writer DOUGLAS BRODE presents a detailed argument as to the theory of innocence, taking into account one of Oswald’s final statements–“I’m a Patsy!”–proceeding from there to trace this unique man’s entire life. Such materials are juxtaposed throughout the book with larger, greater world events that, when viewed from a contrarian perspective, may shed light on who actually wanted Kennedy dead and why. This non-fiction novel is written in the style of an imaginative work, yet events detailed here remain true to fact. As Brode reveals, we can precisely know what Oswald did and said that day, but what actually went on in his, or any person’s, mind can never be fully reclaimed from history, therefore reconstructed here in a freely creative manner to offer “a truth,” if not “the truth,” as to what may have actually happened fifty years ago, and why.

Excerpt from Douglas Brode’s book Patsy:

I’m a patsy … A patsy!”

Lee Harvey Oswald, November 24, 1963; 11:21 A.M.

Ruby-shooting-oswald2As he returned, albeit briefly, to a state of semi-consciousness, Lee Harvey Oswald, age 24 and with less than ten minutes left to live, vaguely recalled saying those words into a TV camera. He couldn’t be certain as to when. Minutes ago? Perhaps. Years, maybe. A lifetime earlier or a split-second, if the concept called ‘time’ existed, something Lee had long since come to doubt.

Once those words were out, everything had suddenly gone dark, as if for a fade-out between a fifteen minute chapter on a television show and the commercials to follow. Funny, isn’t it? Lee thought, if thinking correctly describes what the swiftly dying man’s mind was capable of during those final moments. For now, thoughts and emotions could no longer be separated. The combination of the two tore through Lee’s tight frame and his human consciousness, or what remained of it. With end-game right around the corner, Lee Oswald attempted to understand his own self—however racked with pain—as well as the nightmare-world that had come to enclose him during his less-than-a-quarter-century on earth. Meanwhile, everything around him came in and out of focus whenever Lee managed to flicker his eyes. Bizarre shapes and odd shadows registered, if little else.

At this moment, life—or what Lee could in his agony still perceive of everyday existence—resembled an old black-and-white movie. That made sense, for nothing had ever meant as much to Lee as The Picture Show, as his mother Marguerite long ago had so quaintly referred to it: the one and only place where he had ever been able to set aside the ugliness of his daily reality and discover a few treasured hours of respite in a finer world.

Funny, all the same. For Lee Harvey Oswald had always, ever since he could remember, desired to be famous. Adored by the masses, those very people he had over the years come to hold in contempt. Bizarre how he needed, hungered for their attention, even admiration, perhaps adulation. And, in the early stages of the second-half of the 20th century, that he inhabited for at least a little longer, fame had come to mean television. Appear on TV and your life is fulfilled. The whole world is watching, even as you always believed they ought to be doing.

I was about to tell all … everything! … but as I recall only the first words were out … the prologue, so to speak … “I’m a patsy!” … then, before I could continue … Wham! … the noise, like thunder clapping … or a pistol firing . . yes, that must have been it … I do know the sound of a pistol … rifles, too … no, no, I can’t let myself laugh. Hurts too much … so let’s try to remain calm, concentrate … alright, I had spit those words out … and repeated the last two, just so all would be sure to hear me, loud and clear … and then I … inflated … like a little kid’s balloon some mean man pops with his cigarette while passing by on the carnival midway … no good reason to do so … just to be mean … oh, wait a minute, there was a reason … they had to silence me … of course! … ‘they’ … them! … all of them working together.

Patsy: The Life and Times of Lee Harvey Oswald

Authored by Douglas Brode
List Price: $19.95
6″ x 9″ (15.24 x 22.86 cm)
Black & White on White paper
350 pages
Sunbury Press, Inc.
ISBN-13: 978-1620061909
ISBN-10: 1620061902
BISAC: Fiction / Historical
Also available on Kindle

Trends in Independent Bookstores Following the Borders Closing

by Emma Thomas

bordersWhen Borders closed three years ago, newspapers like the International Business Times stated that the reason for lack of profit was that “bookstores had become park-like for many, a place to relax and look.” Active buying, it seems was lacking, especially with the e-book boom, which seemingly made reading far more affordable and space-saving (at least while the boom lasted). Stores like Borders, comprising large spaces in prime real estate areas, simply couldn’t afford to stay open unless they were supported by public funding. Just when all seemed lost for book stores, however, a new trend began: the rise of the independent bookstore, some in areas like Manhattan’s Upper West Side, described by Head of Global Strategy at Envestnet, Zachary Karabell, as a former “retail book desert”.  The phenomenon led the New York Times to declare, “Print is not dead yet—at least on the Upper West Side”. The American Booksellers Association, meanwhile, notes that the number of independent books stores has risen by 20 per cent.

Karabell notes that Borders and Barnes & Nobel failed on two accounts: they sold shares publicly (which forced them to pursue high profits) and they aimed for high growth (innovation, disruption), which forced them to compete against Amazon. In fact, they should have specialized in fulfilling the demands of selective audiences, as independent bookstores have been doing so well.

Trends and Breakthroughs

Some of the trends we are seeing which are enabling independent bookstores to stay ahead of their game include:

  • A focus on children’s and young adults books: Many parents are discouraged by news reports stating that in the US, children spend up to 90 per cent of their time indoors, attached to electronic devices such as tablets, Smartphones, etc. Independent book stores are attracting these markets through incentives such as teen book clubs and the sale of both new and used books, which appeal to parents keen on fostering a love of reading in their children.
  • Wine bars: ‘I Know You Like a Book’, a small book store in Peoria Heights, Illinois, is an example of an independent book store that is seeing a rise in customer numbers and in sales. Store owner, Mary Beth Nebel, told the press that she believes it has something to do with the unique sensation offered by books, but she also prides herself on her store’s ‘unique spirit’. ‘I Know You Like a Book’ has a wine bar, the meeting point for book clubs and an ideal venue in which to share a love for books with new people. Other stores are offering coffee and healthy treats, a major trend for indie shops across the U.S.
  • Focusing on Local books: Books specializing in local subject matter make great gifts, with independent stores reporting that they sell especially well during the holiday period. Independent book stores are an excellent venue in which to highlight local authors and subjects.
  • Profiting from Hachette booksThe current Amazon-Hachette dispute means that independent book stores are able to offer low-priced Hachette books, since Amazon is currently offering no discounts on these books.
  • Getting people together: Independent book stores have tapped into the power of books to bring people together, by offering workshops, classes and author reading events, not only at the store itself but in community venues.
  • Language book storesThe French Embassy’s  Albertine Books, which shares two floors of the Beaux-Art Payne Whitney mansion, has tapped into the demand for a dedicated French book store, containing everything from fiction and non-fiction work to graphic novels, kids’ books (in English and French) and more, at prices “as reasonable as they are in France”. The new store will also be a meeting point for those learning French, featuring festivals and conversations in French on literature and science.
  • Well curated content: The profound knowledge of indie book sellers in literature (both old, classic works and new releases) allows them to craft a fine selection of books that appeal to their customers. Indie book sellers are able to tune in to their client’s needs by conversing with them, finding out what type of content they are after and ordering books in accordance. The pressure for a high turnover faced by companies like Borders meant that their focus was on new releases, which led them to ignore the constant demand for popular classics from past centuries. Statistics indicate that sales at independent book stores have risen by eight per cent since 2011, their profits offsetting the costs of rent and the purchase and protection of books through stock insuranceWithout an excessive pressure to sell, independent stores are able to specialize, offer quality service and adequately protect stock of a manageable size.