The Joes go Ivy League — appear at Princeton University

Princeton, NJ — Joe Farrell and Joe Farley, collectively known as “The Joes,” the authors of the Keystone Tombstones and Gotham Graves series of biographical histories were in Princeton, NJ on Tuesday May 16th, 2017, researching their upcoming book about the Founders, in preparation for the 250th anniversary of the birth of the USA. Seen here before the statue of patriot John Witherspoon, on the grounds of Princeton University, the two said a few words before those gathered (a huuuuuuge crowd of 1 — the photographer). The pair had been to Witherspoon’s grave in the Princeton Cemetery, very near the graves of patriot Aaron Burr, president Grover Cleveland, and novelist John O’Hara.

Also planned is a special edition entitled Murder, Massacres, and Mayhem in the Mid-Atlantic, for which they visited the graves of Kitty and Jose Menendez.

The Joes are always looking for speaking engagements, providing a humorous and informative program about interesting people and their life stories. Contact us for more information at thejoes@keystonetombstones.com.

Keith Rommel's "Thanatology" series collecting awards in Hollywood on the festival circuit

c-mw-laurelsHOLLYWOOD, CA — The first two books in Keith Rommel’s Thanatology series (Sunbury Press), The Cursed Man and The Lurking Man, have been adapted into feature films and have recently begun their festival runs. Rommel along with director/producer James L. Perry wrote the screenplay for The Cursed Man, and with executive producer Maritza Brikisak for The Lurking Man. Each film took top awards for their screenplay. Now the powerful stories and acting are turning heads. To date, the two films and the novels combined have garnished 60+ awards,  the start of what could be truly spectacular. The film festivals continue throughout most of the year, bringing with them many opportunities. Having won ‘Best Book of the Year’, ‘Best Feature Screenplay’, ‘Best Ensemble’, ‘Best Narrative Feature Film(s)’ and wins in many other categories, the films are a direct reflection of the full length novels and are gaining much attention.

lm_with-laurelsRommel with Frank Krueger, Maritza Brikisak and Felix Martiz is getting ready to bring the third book in the series, The Sinful Man to the big screen. It is yet another powerhouse filled with emotion, psychological terror and reflections on your everyday decisions. Reviewers have called Rommel’s writing, “Horror for the curious mind” and “Thinking man’s fiction.”  This is going to be the most ambitious rendition to date.

Beyond the big screen, Sunbury Press and Rommel are getting ready to release the fourth installment in the series. The Silent Woman is scheduled for a March 7th, 2017 release and is available for pre order now.

"The Crossers" series continues with "Return to the Valley"

MECHANICSBURG, Pa. — Sunbury Press has released “Return to the Valley,” Terry Ray’s fifth installment in “The Crossers” series.

About the Book:
crossers5_fcReturn to the Valley picks up the story, ten years after the conclusion of the epic American Classic Series, Crossing the Valley. The main character, Marty Chapman, has settled into a happy, normal, family life as a college professor in a small town in Kansas and seems to have finally found contentment. As in the original series, however, Marty is not destined for such a life.

This continuing epic, once again, traverses the complete spectrum of human emotions and life experiences that will leave the reader transfixed and in awe.

This story winds its way through romantic love and family bliss, to the revealing inside story of the treacherous, back-stabbing, real world of university faculty, to pure evil, blackmailing co-eds, homicide and the anatomy of a sensational murder trial, to heroism and betrayal, and the evolution of a new and quickly growing religion that is changing the world forever.

If you are the type of reader who wants to become thoroughly engrossed in a novel and left pondering some of the fundamental questions of life and death, Return to the Valley will wonderfully fulfill your reading niche.

Excerpt:
May 15, 2004
With his eyes on the sidewalk, Marty Chapman quickly crossed the quad and entered Watson Hall. His stomach was churning emptiness into nausea, having not contained food since yesterday at noon. He climbed to the third floor then walked the worn corridor carpet to Ken Broderick’s office. He was dizzy from anxiety and lack of sleep and was experiencing a disconcerting out-of-body sensation. Ken looked up from his newspaper and was taken aback by Marty’s appearance as he passed through the open door.

“Jesus, Marty . . . you look like shit . . . what’s the matter?”

Marty didn’t respond with his usual sardonic retort but instead moved in silence to his designated lunch-hour-chat chair. He sat down and stared between his feet at the beige, coffee-stained rug for a few seconds, then looked up at Ken with nervous eyes. Ken waited for Marty to speak. He didn’t. He kept licking his lips and trying to swallow. After a few more long seconds, Ken spoke.

“What happened, Marty?”

Marty’s gaze intensified with alternating shades of guilt, shame, and fear. Without answering, he walked over to the open door and closed it. After doing so, he paused and took a few deep breaths through his nose, then, with a lowered head, humped shoulders, and hands in his pockets, he returned to his chair and swallowed a few more times in an attempt to lubricate his dry throat. He looked up at the ceiling, with his head moving side to side then, lowering his face, he looked directly at Ken and crossed his arms across his chest to hug himself. Ken could see he was quivering. Marty felt very sick.

“Oh Jesus, Ken . . . oh Jesus.”

“What . . . what is it?”

“Oh man . . . what am I gonna do . . . what am I gonna do?”

Marty was rocking forward and back in his chair and speaking more to himself than to Ken, so Ken waited in silence for the continuation of the soliloquy. It resumed after a rather long silence.

Return to the Valley
Authored by Terry Ray
List Price: $16.95
6″ x 9″ (15.24 x 22.86 cm)
Black & White on Cream paper
226 pages
Sunbury Press, Inc.
ISBN-13: 978-1620066898
ISBN-10: 1620066890
BISAC: Fiction / Visionary & Metaphysical

Available on Kindle

For more information, please see:
http://www.sunburypressstore.com/The-Crossers-Book-5-Retu…

Who killed Confederate General Earl Van Dorn?

VICKSBURG, Miss.Sunbury Press has released Where Elephants Fought: A Story of Murder and Intrigue During the Civil War, Bridget Smith’s historical novel about the death of Confederate General Earl Van Dorn.

wef_fcFor 150 years, scholars and amateur Civil War buffs have misinterpreted the infamous murder of the well-known Confederate General Earl Van Dorn. Based on twenty years of intense research, the author suggests that all is not as it appears. The real motivation behind the doctor’s decision to murder Van Dorn is not a story of jealousy between a husband and wife, but of loyalty and sacrifice. This story reveals one woman’s struggle with the blame for another’s crime and the secret that fractured the Peters family forever. Perhaps most compelling is the impact the tragedy has had on the Peters family, with the continued perpetuation of the 150 year old lie to this day.

Excerpt:
The soldiers lay down a section of split-rail fence for use in repairing the Duck River Bridge and tied the rails end to end behind an old mule. When the mule got stuck in the frozen muddy road leading to Columbia, they walked on the planks to avoid the flooded roadbed, balancing themselves on the beams like delicate ballerinas. They avoided getting wet at all costs. They understood frostbite. Just keep out of the water was all a fellow had to do. The camp doctor had preached this ever since a bunch of them showed up with black toes after the last march from Ripley.

Crossing the washed-out road had taken more time than anticipated. Most of them were exhausted by the time they reached dry ground, and though he was eager to reach Columbia by evening, General Van Dorn announced they would rest there till morning. They had but a few hours’ march remaining, but complaints had been rumbling up the line since morning. The general knew well the repercussions of pushing the men beyond their limits. The train of men and horses stopped abruptly as orders were sent down the line. A few men grumbled from within the ranks about wasting time now with such a short distance remaining, but Van Dorn ignored them. Better listen to the ones who moaned and complained. Better to stop the procession. Corinth taught him that.

A handful of men from Company E, Third Texas Infantry, warmed their hands by the fire near a grove of trees at the far corner of an old cornfield. General Van Dorn floated from campfire to campfire, making small talk with the men. He stopped just as he reached Private James Thomas who sat at the base of a large elm tree. The private propped his journal against the mass of bark, pulled a pencil from his coat pocket, and scribbled across the top line of the page.

“Private?” Van Dorn smiled at him and leaned forward.

“Yes, sir!” Thomas shot up off the ground and saluted his commander. His face turned red with embarrassment.

“At ease, soldier.” The general leaned against the trunk of the tree. He picked at a blade of grass as he spoke. “About your brother,” he said in a whisper. “He was a fine soldier, son. I want you to know that.”

Private Thomas looked away and nodded. “Yes, sir. Will was a fine soldier indeed. Mighty nice of you to say so.”

Van Dorn put a hand on his shoulder. “You can tell your mama, too. In that letter you’re writing.”

Thomas turned to the general and smiled. “Yes, sir. I’ll tell her. He was mighty fond of you, sir, I’ll tell you that.”

“Thank you, soldier. It’s not often I hear—” But he stopped there. “Give your mother my condolences if you will.”

The private smiled. “Yes sir. I’ll do that right now.” He picked up the notebook and finished the letter as the general walked away toward another group of soldiers.

Van-DornFebruary 21, 1863

Last night we had some biscuits cooked at a house close to our camp. Consequently we fared finely today… The railroad is close to a town named Columbia. This is the place where General Pillow lives who built the fortifications at Fort Pillow on the Mississippi. M. D. Cooper and D. Frierson & Company also reside here. There is a large female Academy in town. We traveled all day in a very hard rain. The water run in my boots. The weather got very cold and I came very near freezing. The Yankee pickets are in fifteen miles of our camp.

General Van Dorn has just spent a private moment with me to let me know his sorrow over poor Will’s passing. He bids me tell my dear mother what a fine soldier Will was. I believe he is the finest soldier and man in the whole of the Confederate army.

From your loving son,
Jimmie

About the Author:
Bridget Smith was born and raised in Columbia, a lush Tennessee valley town filled with antebellum homes and sprawling farms, a setting that both haunted and intrigued her until she could give it life in her Civil War era novel Where Elephants Fought. From the first glimpse into the lives of Jessie McKissack Peters and General Earl Van Dorn, she felt a deep connection to the story and soon found herself immersed in the world of research, a task that what would span nearly twenty years. After receiving her MEd in English, she soon married and moved to a quaint Mississippi town, a town not unlike her beautiful Columbia and equally as steeped in Civil War history. She has taught English for over twenty years and currently teaches English Composition. Though her life is a whirlwind with her four children, she has begun writing her second novel, a modern tale of sin and eccentricities set in her beloved South.

Where Elephants Fought: A Story of Murder and Intrigue During the Civil War
List Price: $19.95
5.5″ x 8.5″ (13.97 x 21.59 cm)
Black & White on Cream paper
336 pages
Sunbury Press, Inc.
ISBN-13: 978-1620065983
ISBN-10: 1620065983
BISAC: Fiction / Mystery & Detective / Historical

For more information, please see:
http://www.sunburypressstore.com/Where-Elephants-Fought-9…