As the Greenland ice melts, something horrible lurks beneath

WOODS HOLE, Mass. — Sunbury Press has released the climate fiction (Cli-Fi) thriller Ice Canyon Monster, Keith Rommel’s novella about the consequences of global warming.

What Others Are Saying:
When a Greenland shaman decides to fight back against global warming and the harm it is doing to his people, a powerful series of events unfolds in this cli-fi thriller. Keith Rommel knows how to spin a great yarn!
– Dan Bloom, The Cli-Fi Report

About the Book:
icm_fcHUNGER WILL BRING ANYTHING TO THE SURFACE …
The Eskimo people of Greenland have grown tired of the damage being done to their country. Global warming from emissions that stem from the shipping lanes that run between Canada and Greenland has made people that live close to the coast sick. Cancer, asthma and as many as 5,000 deaths a year have been attributed to this pollution. A single cargo ship in one year burns more emissions than 50 million gasoline burning vehicles.

When Akutak, a Greenlandic Shaman Eskimo, decides to take action against the things that are destroying his country, he uses the ancient arts and creates a tupilak and with it and conjures a curse. Designed in the form of an octopus, this Goliath is going to become Greenland’s guardian and do everything within its power to stop the erosion of the ice sheet.

But not everyone sees the Tupilak Octopus as a champion and they seek to destroy it. But the only way to destroy it is to conjure something more powerful and Akutak may be Greenland’s most powerful shaman.

This novelette is part of the Cli-Fi movement and contains stunning facts surrounding Greenland and the danger this beautiful country faces from big oil to overused shipping lanes. Akutak and his Tupilak Octopus has one message: leave Greenland alone! – Read this highly educational novel with a great fiction story intertwined within the startling facts.

Excerpt:
Akutak knelt down on the hard, cold surface of a mountainous ice sheet that overlooked the valley’s deep ice canyon. A large rivulet carried fast-moving glacial water, and the sound of the running river was loud enough to reach Akutak even at this altitude.

Located in the interior of Greenland, beneath the ice sheet and river flow, was a canyon that snaked around and reached the Petermann Glacier on the northern coast. The water melt also flowed beneath the ice and was released into the Arctic Ocean.

True to old tradition almost lost throughout the centuries, Akutak wore the skins of animals that were captured for their meat. The skins were sewn together by his wife. She was a skilled seamstress and made him kamiks, trousers and anoraks, gloves and a hat. It was her skill that protected him against the harsh elements and kept him alive. Knowing she made the clothing, the frigid cold was of no concern; in Greenland it is said a man is what his wife makes him.

Opening the flap of an animal skin sack that was slung over his shoulder, he peered inside and saw what he had placed there before he left home at first light.

The wind whipped and reminded Akutak that where he was was inhospitable and unwelcoming. But still, he continued to move forward with the plan that took him nearly two years to complete; shrouded in silence even to his kin. What he created and what he was about to do was never shared with anyone else. It couldn’t be because that was the way.

He carefully reached into his sack and pulled out a hand-sized tupilaq. This carefully handmade avenging monster was created to keep people away from his native land, which was shrinking each year because of global warming.

The shaman began to chant in his native tongue of Inuit. He called forth in a repeated rhythmic sound, reciting his desire to make those who caused it to pay for what his country was suffering. He wanted to instill fear and summoned a beast, large and unstoppable, filled with the rage of his ancestors. This beast would do terrible things to keep people away from Greenland.

He looked at the tupilaq, made the traditional way to ensure its effectiveness; the design represented exactly what he foresaw as being the bringer of fear and order, death, and a reluctance to challenge the waters around Greenland. Made from carved bone, dried and stretched skin, woven hair and sinew, the totem even contained parts from dead children.

Drawing himself close to the ridge, each footfall carefully placed so as not to plunge to his death, his chant continued as he looked over the edge and into the clear water. He held onto the tupilaq, looked at his work one last time to make sure it was good enough, and then held it out and released it over the flowing water.

About the Author:
Keith Rommel is the author of numerous fiction thrillers, best known for his Thanatology Series, which includes The Cursed Man, and The Lurking Man, both of which are becoming Hollywood movies. Keith is also a screenwriter.

Ice Canyon Monster
Authored by Keith Rommel
List Price: $9.99
5″ x 8″ (12.7 x 20.32 cm)
Black & White on Cream paper
136 pages
Sunbury Press, Inc.
ISBN-13: 978-1620067222
ISBN-10: 1620067226
BISAC: Fiction / Sea Stories

Also available on Kindle

For more information, please see:
http://www.sunburypressstore.com/Ice-Canyon-Monster-9781620067222.htm

Dr. Miller's "Politics" prevails among Sunbury Press bestsellers. Cli-Fi novel leads fiction.

MECHANICSBURG, Pa. — Sunbury Press has released the bestsellers list for September, 2015. Dr. William N. Miller took the top spot with his education memoir “The Politics of Prevailing.” Dr. Edward Rubin’s Cli-Fi novel “The Heatstroke Line” led fiction in 3rd place. Darla Henry’s “3-5-7 Model” was 2nd.

SUNBURY PRESS – Bestsellers for September, 2015 (by Revenue)
Rank Last Month Title Author Category
1 NEW The Politics of Prevailing William N Miller Education
2 The 3-5-7 Model Darla Henry Counseling
3 NEW The Heatstroke Line Edward Rubin Climate Fiction
4 4 Capital Murder Chris Papst Investigation
5 5 Where Elephants Fought Bridget Smith Historical Fiction
6 11 Call Sign Dracula Joe Fair War Memoir
7 NEW The Alabaster Jar Marie Sontag YA Fiction
8 3 The Segregated Georgia School for the Deaf Ron Knorr & Clemmie Whatley History
9 NEW The Penns’ Manor of Spread Eagle and the Grist Mills of the Upper Mahantongo Valley Steve Troutman History
10 The Sign of the Eagle Jess Steven Hughes Historical Fiction
11 Murder Run Shelly Frome Murder Mystery
12 19 Raising Monarchs Sue Fox McGovern Nature
13 10 Dead of Summer Sherry Knowlton Murder Mystery
14 The Wolf of Britannia Part II Jess Steven Hughes Historical Fiction
15 The Wolf of Britannia Part I Jess Steven Hughes Historical Fiction
16 7 The B Team Alan Mindell Sports Fiction
17 A Brother’s Cold Case Dennis Herrick Murder Mystery
18 12 Winter of the Metal People Dennis Herrick Historical Fiction
19 Head Over Wheels Ken Mercurio Medical Memoir
20 26 That Night at Surigao Ernie Marshall History
21 Beagle Tales 5 Bob Ford Humor
22 15 The Bronze Dagger Marie Sontag YA Fiction
23 Dead of Autumn Sherry Knowlton Murder Mystery
24 Beagle Tales 4 Bob Ford Humor
25 9 The Closer Alan Mindell Sports Fiction
26 Courting Doubt and Darkness J M West Murder Mystery
27 Dying for Vengeance J M West Murder Mystery
28 1 Jesus the Phoenician Karim El Koussa Religious History
29 14 Amelia Earhart: The Truth at Last Mike Campbell History
30 18 Pit Bulls Anthony Julian History

tpop_fcSales for the 3rd quarter just ended were nearly double sales in Q3 of 2014. EBooks were down about 10% over the same quarterly period. Hardcover sales are up 10x from Q3 2014. Year-to-date, sales are up over 92% from 2014. Comparing Septembers, sales were nearly 1.5x higher, year-over-year. The company is expecting its best 4th quarter ever.

Dr. William Miller’s “The Politics of Prevailing” rocketed to the top thanks to advance sales. Darla Henry’s “The 3-5-7 Model” placed due to orders for conferences in Canada. “The Heatstroke Line,” Dr. Edward Rubin’s first novel is pioneering in the “Cli-Fi” category, burning up to #3 due to author activities. Chris Papst’s “Capital Murder” held at #4 as the author appeared on numerous radio programs nationwide. Bridget Smith’s historical novel “Where Elephants Fought” stuck at #5 thanks to author appearances in Mississippi. “Call Sign Dracula,” the Vietnam memoir by Joe Fair, moved up again to #6 thanks to author appearances at veterans events. Marie Sontag’s new historical YA novel, “The Alabaster Jar,” debuted at #7 due to author appearances at schools. It’s prequel, “The Bronze Dagger,” also charted at #22. “The Segregated Georgia School for he Deaf,” by professors Ron Knorr and Clemmie Whatley of Mercer University, slid to #8, but continues to sell steadily. “The Penns’ Manor of Spread Eagle and the Grist Mills of the Upper Mahantongo Valley” by Steve Troutman ground to #9 thanks to advance orders. Jess Steven Hughes’ three novels: “The Sign of the Eagle” (#10), “The Wolf of Britannia Part II (#14), and “The Wolf of Britannia Part I” (#15) marched onto three spots on the chart in tandem with author appearances in Washington and Oregon. Shelly Frome’s recently-released “Murder Run” vaulted to #11 prior to author appearances in North Carolina. “Raising Monarchs,” Sue Fox McGovern’s instructions on saving these disappearing butterlies, flitted to #12 due to sales to bookstores. Sherry thsl_fcKnowlton’s “Dead of Summer” (#13), and “Dead of Autumn” (#23) held two spots thanks to author appearances. Alan Mindell’s sports novels The B Team (#16) and The Closer (#25) perservered thanks to continued interest in the author’s new website and blog and his appearance schedule. Dennis Herrick was another author with two books on the chart: “A Brother’s Cold Case” #17 and “Winter of the Metal People” next in line at #18. Dennis continues his appearance schedule in New Mexico. Ken Mercurio’s “Head Over Wheels” flipped back onto the chart at #19. Ernie Marshall’s account of the last conflict between battleships, That Night at Surigao, was #20, thanks to author activity. Bob Ford nabbed two spots with his hilarious “Beagle Tales 5” at #21, and “Beagle Tales 4” at #24. J M West also doubled with “Courting Doubt and Darkness” at #26, and “Dying for Vengeance” at #27. “Jesus the Phoenician,” Kareem El Koussa’s controversial history of the Son of God, held on the list at #28 as his US tour ebbed. Two mainstays, Mike Campbell’s “Amelia Earhart: The Truth at Last, ” and Anthony Julian’s “Pit Bulls” continued their streaks on the chart at #29 and #30 respectively.

The company released eight new titles during the month of September.

SUNBURY PRESS – New Releases for September, 2015
Ionica Catalina Petcov Biography
The Heatstroke Line Edwin Rubin Climate Fiction
White River Monster IV Keith Rommel Thriller Fiction
White River Monster V Keith Rommel Thriller Fiction
White River Monster VI Keith Rommel Thriller Fiction
The Alabaster Jar Marie Sontag YA Fiction
Hairy Men in Caves Marlin Bressi History
High Passes John Timmerman Western

For a list of Sunbury’s best-sellers, please see the Sunbury Press web site:
http://www.sunburypressstore.com/BESTSELLERS_c3.htm
For a complete list of recent and upcoming releases, please see:
http://www.sunburypressstore.com/COMING-SOON_c47.htm

Stephan Malone envisions future cities at the poles in his "how-to" guide "Polar City Dreaming"

"Polar City Dreaming"Sunbury Press has released “Polar City Dreaming:How Climate Change Might Usher In The Age Of Polar Cities” by Stephan Malone.  Danny Bloom contributed the introduction.  Artist Victoria Goodman created the cover artwork.

About the book:
Stephan Malone has written a book that, if you read it carefully, will change your life and the way you look at the future. Read it in that spirit, and remember that life in so-called “polar cities”arrayed around the shores of an ice-free Arctic Ocean in a greenhouse-warmed world is coming down the road in the distant future.

Not now, not yet. But soon. A hundred years? Three hundred years? Five hundred years. ”Soon!” (scare quotes mine). James Lovelock, who in 1972 conceived of Earth’s crust, climate and veneer of life as a unified self-sustaining entity, Gaia, foresees humanity in full pole-bound retreat within the next 500 to 1,000 years as areas around the tropics roast — a scenario far outside even the worst-case projections of climate scientists. Lovelock is serious, I am serious and Stephan Malone’s book is serious, too. Read it and weep for humankind. But also read it as a guide to taking action so that this nightmare scenario never has to happen.

In 2007, I began setting Web sites showing designs by Taiwanese artist Deng Cheng-hong for self-sufficient Arctic communities. My intent was to conduct mere a ”thought experiment” that might prod people out of their comfort zones on climate — which remains, for many, even today, a someday, somewhere issue. “At six going on eight billion people,” Lovelock told the New York Times in an interview in 2006, “the idea of any further development is almost obscene. We’ve got to learn how to retreat from the world that we’re in. Planning a good retreat is always a good measure of generalship.” The retreat, Lovelock insisted, even then, would be toward the poles. Enter the concept of “polar cities” for survivors of global warming and climate chaos in some far distant future, at least 30 generations from now, if not more. Of course, it sounds like a dubious scenario, But there is already an intensifying push to develop Arctic resources and test shipping routes that could soon become practical should the floating sea ice in the Arctic routinely vanish in future summers.

Sensing this shift, the U.S. Coast Guard has already proposed establishing its first permanent Arctic presence, a helicopter station in Barrow, Alaska, the northernmost town in the United States. It’s not a stretch to think of Barrow as a hub for expanding commercial fishing and trade through the Bering Strait. The strategic significance of an ”opening Arctic” recently was described in an article by Scott Borgerson, a former Coast Guard officer who is now a scholar at the Council on Foreign Relations. “It is no longer a matter of if, but when, the Arctic Ocean will open to regular marine transportation and exploration of its lucrative natural-resource deposits,” he wrote. While he didn’t mention polar cities per se, it’s not a stretch to imagine where they will first be situated. Mr. Malone’s book is paving the way humans will see the future — and polar life.

As humans are driven to Arctic shores by climate calamity at lower latitudes over the next thousand years — perhaps sooner! –it’s a sure bet that the far north will be an ever busier place. Urban planners, get out your mukluks. Readers, use this far-seeing book as a home resource to help you to envision what life might very well be like for our ancestors, far far down “the road.”          –Danny Bloom

Polar City Dreaming: How Climate Change Might Usher In The Age Of Polar Cities
Authored by Stephan Malone, Introduction by Danny Bloom, Cover design or artwork by Victoria Goodman
List Price: $16.95
8″ x 10″ (20.32 x 25.4 cm)
Full Color on White paper
72 pages
Sunbury Press, Inc.
ISBN-13: 978-1620061749
ISBN-10: 1620061740
BISAC: Science / Earth Sciences / Meteorology & Climatology

For more information, please see:
http://www.sunburypressstore.com/Polar-City-Dreaming-9781…

Also available on Kindle