James A. Campbell leads the way into the realm of pastoral ministry in care settings for older adults

MECHANICSBURG, Pa. — Sunbury Press has released James A. Campbell’s second edition of his classic book,What Do You Say, about ministering in eldercare settings.

About the Book:
wdys_fcLearning to Listen for Grace Among Our Elders
This is the 25th anniversary edition of What Do You Say? Its first publishing necessitated further printing. Once out of print, requests kept coming for a new edition. Twenty-five years after its release, it was still being used as a model of discovering the blessing of our elders. Its truths more than ever speak to the larger hunger and urgency of engaged listening in an isolating, disconnected world.

James A. Campbell leads the way into the realm of pastoral ministry in care settings for older adults. What do you say in such settings? Campbell is unflinchingly honest about the question. More than anything, he wants to know where and how grace is found in such ministry settings; and his answer is simple, direct, touching, and passionate: “You don’t say. You listen.” Finely wrought accounts of shared humor, pathos, history, and heritage show why listening to and with older adults is one of the surest ways to connect with the grace that sustains us all. (From the first edition.)

Contents:
Preface by John A. Campbell, MD
Introduction by the late Bishop Rueben P. Job
Review by the publisher from the First Edition
Empathetic Knowing
PART I: THE STORY
What Do You Say?
Ribbons and Waves
Whoop
The Lame Duck
Half of Human History
Sharing the Blessing
PART II: THE LESSONS
Need Is Not a One-Way Street
Mom Nichols
Sacred Space
PART III: GOODNESS AND OLDNESS
White Hair Doesn’t Make a Saint
Doing and Being
PART IV: SACRED TRADITION
Sacred Tradition
Empathetic Knowing
About the Author

jcampbellAbout the Author:
Reverend James A. Campbell, D. Min. served for forty years as a pastor, with an emphasis on ministry with elders. The Iowa Health Care Association bestowed on Rev. Campbell “Iowa Clergy of the Year” for his model of creative listening in geriatric settings. The ministry with elders took new form and emphasis as Rev. Campbell was in mission work in Alaska and the Russian Far East. From this came a program of nurturing spiritual community and blessing of the aged that he developed with Alaska Native elders and called, “Giving Voice.” Rev. Campbell is the author of seven books on ministry. He lives in retirement with wife, Maggie, in Beulah, Colorado, where he continues his interest in discerning different ways of knowing. He seeks to find how each way of knowing unfolds into wonder, and wonder into the sacred.

What Others Are Saying:
“This book does not offer six simple steps to effective ministry with aging persons. It does offer a way of listening and seeing that can open all of us to the rich harvest of life within and around us. I commend to you the practice of learning to listen for grace.” — Bishop Rueben P. Job (1928-2015)

“I encourage you to soak up the deep wisdom of this book, wisdom born of Jim’s years of ministry to elders. Take these words to heart while those you love can still tell you their stories, and you can still listen.” — John A. Campbell, MD, Physician of Geriatric Medicine

“This book is a must read for families, friends, and health professionals or any who plan interactions with older adults. Empathetic knowing of the depth and beauty of others enriches not only our lives but those we serve.” — David B. Carr, M.D., Professor of Geriatric Medicine and Neurology, Washington University School of Medicine.

“Reverand Campbell has given us a treasure. A guide to the art of listening and a dose of pure inspiration!” — Elizabeth L. Cobbs M.D., Professor of Geriatric and Palliative Care Medicine, George Washington University School of Medicine.

What Do You Say?: Learning to Listen for Grace Among Our Elders
Authored by James A Campbell
List Price: $9.99
5″ x 8″ (12.7 x 20.32 cm)
Black & White on Cream paper
82 pages
Sunbury Press, Inc.
ISBN-13: 978-1620066973
ISBN-10: 1620066971
BISAC: Family & Relationships / Eldercare

Also available on Kindle
For more information, please see:
http://www.sunburypressstore.com/What-Do-You-Say-97816200…

A review of the Sharon Marchisello's novel Going Home

by Barbara Matthews

gh_fcThe doorbell rang…” and in through that doorway Sharon Marchisello issues forth one bombshell after another in her contemporary murder mystery, Going Home.

Michelle DePalma arrives at her mother’s home to find that the door is uncharacteristically wide open. Upon entering, she finds a young woman dead on the floor with her mother hovering nearby—seemingly unaware of what has taken place in the foyer of her home.

As Marchisello weaves her intricate tale, the doorway introduces:

  • Unknown family: “I’m Isabella Rogers, and this is my daughter, Giovanna. I’m your daughter-in-law.”
  • A policeman: “Michelle, I’m afraid the evidence is pointing to your mother.”
  • A man with a raised baseball bat: “Where’s that crazy old broad that killed my Brittany?”
  • A potential suspect who appears in: “The same vehicle I had passed on my way up the street the day I arrived, the day Brittany had died!”

Going Home draws attention to specific issues of Alzheimer’s disease as well as caregiving problems in general:

  • wandering;
  • long-distance caregiving;
  • finding reliable caregiving agencies and personnel;
  • financial exploitation;
  • sibling relationships / shared responsibility; and
  • the difficulties of facing death and dying

wtdam_fcAlthough Going Home addresses important caregiving issues, it does so in a manner that will intrigue a wide-variety of readers. I recommend it highly.

Barbara Matthews is the co-author of What to Do About Mama?: A Guide to Caring for Aging Family Members

Going Home

 Authored by Sharon Marchisello
List Price: $16.95
5.5″ x 8.5″ (13.97 x 21.59 cm)
Black & White on White paper
284 pages
Sunbury Press, Inc.
ISBN-13: 978-1620064382
ISBN-10: 1620064383
BISAC: Fiction / Mystery & Detective / General
For more information, please see: http://www.sunburypressstore.com/Going-Home-9781620064382.htm

Essential guide to caregiving

by S. H. Marchisello

wtdam_fcI wish a book like What to Do about Mama? had been available in 2000 when my mother was suffering from Alzheimer’s, or even a decade later, when we faced the same issues with my mother-in-law. Because America’s population is aging and more and more baby boomers—“the sandwich generation”—are being thrust into caregiving roles, this book is very timely and reassures you that you are not alone. Seeking help is not a weakness; it may be necessary to retain your sanity.

In What to Do about Mama? we hear about the very different experiences of the co-authors, as well as testimonials from numerous other caregivers:

  • Barbara Matthews cared for her mother-in-law in her home for four years. She felt like the warm relationship she’d had with her in-laws deteriorated during the process, due to criticism, second-guessing, and an unwillingness to share the burden to the level expected.
  • Barbara Trainin Blank cared for her mother at a distance for about two years. Because her mother had Alzheimer’s, she had to hire full-time aides and manage the caregiving from afar.
  • The majority of the testimonials from interviewees dealt with the care of a parent, although some of the people provided care for spouses, children, and other relatives.
  • The testimonials covered experiences with home care, long distance care, nursing home and hospice care, as well as assisted living arrangements.

Some of the people had good experiences; for others, caregiving became a nightmare. Some had siblings and other relatives who were supportive; others bore the burden alone. Some families grew closer; others were driven apart. For some, the care period was only for a few months, for others, the arrangement lasted years. But the almost universal consensus was that caregiving is hard and unpredictable. Even those who had previous experience in the medical field and elder care were hit with surprises.

What to Do about Mama? is divided into 10 chapters that discuss different aspects of caregiving. Snippets of the stories, which appear elsewhere in the book in their entirety, are interspersed where appropriate to drive home a point. Each story illustrates an important caregiving theme.

gh_fcIn my mystery novel, Going Home, I only show a small slice of the caregiving experience as the drama unfolds. What to Do about Mama? hits you with the hard reality.

Highly recommended for anyone who might someday assume a caregiving role. Read it before you need it, and then keep it around for reference!

Sharon Marchisello is the author of Going Home, a murder mystery about an elderly woman who allegedly kills her caretaker.

What to Do about Mama?: A Guide to Caring for Aging Family Members

 Authored by Barbara G. Matthews, Authored by Barbara Trainin Blank
List Price: $19.95
6″ x 9″ (15.24 x 22.86 cm)
Black & White on White paper
230 pages
Sunbury Press, Inc.
ISBN-13: 978-1620063156
ISBN-10: 1620063158
BISAC: Family & Relationships / Eldercare
For more information, please see: http://www.sunburypressstore.com/What-to-Do-about-Mama-9781620063156.htm

Review of "What To Do About Mama?: A Guide To Caring for Aging Family Members"

By Fairy C. Hayes-Scott, Ph.D., MarketingNewAuthors.com

wtdam_fcThe authors, Barbara G. Matthews and Barbara Tranin Blank, have presented a comprehensive work that will benefit every person who is in the position of being a caregiver.

The authors provide key information for all caregivers in every situation that can occur. Their work discusses the caregivers’ various responsibilities, the care receivers’ different reactions to their care, the wide support that hospice gives beyond moribund preparation, and the challenges posed by family members not providing the care. There are caregivers’ different narratives that clearly illustrate the situations that any caregiver will face. These narratives provide solid advice in a personal style that will maintain the reader’s interest.

An especially effective method is the personal sharing by each author. They have very different experiences, one providing within her home and one providing care from a distance. Their narratives that are interspersed throughout the work add to the authenticity of the work. Although personal, both authors do their best to maintain objectivity; they do not present information in a cold manner or overly subjective manner. Their sharing of personal experiences is quite effective.

Since this reviewer has been a caregiver with three family members, I know these authors’ experiences and the sharing by different individuals are very real. And the information they give will benefit every person who is a caregiver or a care receiver.

The culmination of the book is the chapter that provides clear recommendations for every caregiver. This chapter alone is well worth the purchase of the work. And as one who has been a caregiver, What To Do About Mama I know that this book is a must-read for every individual who wants to be a prepared and effective caregiver and a cooperative and more understanding care receiver.

Elderly woman with Alzheimer's accused of murdering her caregiver

PEACHTREE CITY, Ga.Sunbury Press has released Sharon Marchisello’s murder mystery novel Going Home, about a daughter’s quest to help her mother who is suffering from Alzeimer’s and is accused of murder.

gh_fcAbout the Book:
Michelle DePalma expected to jet into Two Wells, Texas, check on her elderly mother, and hurry back to her orderly life in Atlanta, where she has a happy marriage and satisfying career. Instead, she finds her mother, Lola Hanson, hovered over the bludgeoned body of her caregiver, Brittany Landers.

Since the events of 9/11, one month earlier, Lola’s memory loss has amplified, and the family suspects Alzheimer’s. Now Lola can’t tell anyone what happened to Brittany.

The agency that provides home care for Lola promptly withdraws its services. Michelle is stuck in her home town longer than planned as she cares for a mother with whom she has never been close and tries to prove her innocence. The police officers who investigate the crime are old antagonists from grade school. A secret thought to be long buried—that Michelle bore a son out of wedlock and gave him up for adoption—surfaces when a surprise daughter-in-law and granddaughter show up, distracting Michelle from her quest to solve the murder. And then she stumbles upon a motive which makes Lola look even more guilty.

Going Home was inspired by the author’s mother’s battle with Alzheimer’s and explores the challenge of solving a murder mystery when a potential witness cannot rely on her memory. Written from the perspective of a baby boomer forced to reverse roles with her parents, it crosses into the mainstream genre of women’s fiction and touches increasingly common issues such as elder abuse and end-of-life decisions.

Excerpt:
My mother never left the front door wide open—no way would she “heat the whole neighborhood.”

I jumped out of my rental car and hurried up the walkway. This was my first visit in over a month—since before the awful events of September 11—and although I had spoken to my elderly mother over the phone several times a week, I was not sure what to expect.

“Mom, what—?”

A smile illuminated my mother’s face as if someone had twisted a dimmer switch. “Michelle! It’s so nice to see you!” She took a step toward me, right through the puddle of blood.

On the tile floor a young woman was sprawled, her blond hair caked with blood. I knelt at her side. No pulse. No breath. Blue-gray pallor. It had been years since I’d been proficient in CPR, and it wasn’t coming back to me. How many compressions? “Have you called 9-1-1?” My voice shook as I uttered those numbers.

“What’s wrong with Brittany?” My mother squatted beside me as if we were playing a game.

“Mom, what happened?” I cried. What if this woman—Brittany—was dead? Ants gathered at a stream of coagulated blood from her nostrils. “Did you call 9-1-1?”

Mom’s blank stare confirmed she had not. Unlike most of my friends, I had no cell phone, so I dashed to the black wall phone in the kitchen.

“What is your emergency?” The female voice was pleasant but businesslike, with an East Texas twang.

I gave my name and our address. “My mother’s caregiver is unconscious, maybe even dead. I just got here, so I can’t say for sure what happened, but it looks like a blow to the head.”

“I’ll send paramedics right away.” She confirmed the address I had given her. “Is the victim breathing?”

“No.”

“Is there a pulse?”

“I couldn’t find one.” My own heart pounded.

“Has anyone started CPR?”

“Not yet. I called you first.” Had I made a fatal mistake?

“Is anyone else in danger?”

“In danger? What do you mean?”

“Is the person who did this still there? Is he trying to hurt anyone else?”

“No … I mean, I don’t think so. I didn’t see what happened.”

“Are you alone?”

“My mother’s here. But she’s seventy seven years old and …”

“The emergency crew should arrive momentarily. I’ll stay on the line until they get there, so leave the phone off the hook. Do you know CPR?”

“I was a flight attendant for ten years. We reviewed CPR every spring in recurrent training, but I never used it for real. And it’s been nine years since I left In-Flight …”

The woman politely cut off my blathering with brief instructions to refresh my memory and told me to start CPR.

“Lord!” The voice of Karen Jackson, another of my mother’s caregivers, boomed from the entryway.

“Don’t do this, Britt!” Karen was bent over Brittany’s body when I returned from making the call. Mouth wide open, eyes popping like peeled grapes, Karen looked up as I approached.

I knelt beside her and began chest compressions as Karen tried to blow air into Brittany’s lungs.

About the Author:
Sharon Marchisello is the author of The Ghost on Timber Way, part of a short story anthology featuring fellow Sisters in Crime members. She has published a personal finance e-book entitled Live Cheaply, Be Happy, Grow Wealthy, as well as numerous travel articles and corporate training manuals. Sharon grew up in Tyler, Texas, and earned her Bachelor of Arts from the University of Houston in French and English. She studied for a year in Tours, France, on a Rotary scholarship and then moved to Los Angeles to pursue her Masters in Professional Writing at the University of Southern California. Now she lives in Peachtree City, Georgia, with her husband and cat. Retired from a 27-year career with Delta Air Lines, she does volunteer work for the Fayette Humane Society.

Going Home
Authored by Sharon Marchisello
List Price: $16.95
5.5″ x 8.5″ (13.97 x 21.59 cm)
Black & White on White paper
284 pages
Sunbury Press, Inc.
ISBN-13: 978-1620064382
ISBN-10: 1620064383
BISAC: Fiction / Mystery & Detective / General

Also available on Kindle and Nook

For more information, please see:

http://www.sunburypressstore.com/Going-Home-9781620064382…

How will you care for your elderly parents? Matthews and Blank provide the answers.

HARRISBURG, Pa. — Sunbury Press has released Barbara G. Matthews’ and Barbara Trainin Blank’s self-help book “What to Do about Mama?: A Guide to Caring for Aging Family Members.”

wtdam_fcAbout the Book:

Everyone is a potential caregiver.

Fifty-four million Americans already serve as unpaid caregivers to family members, and that number is likely to grow as the population continues to age.

Two-thirds of these caregivers are women—many of them in the “sandwich generation,” simultaneously caring for both children and older family members.

This book offers guidance to present and future caregivers—based on the real-life experiences of the authors and other caregivers who have openly and honestly shared their joys and heartaches. It isn’t a book by “experts,” but by people in the trenches—to help you develop realistic goals and expectations and strategies to keep your sanity through the trials and tribulations of caregiving.

Your experiences may be similar to or different from those of the caregivers featured here, but their stories are likely to resonate with anyone who has cared for a loved one—or might.

Table of Contents:

Introduction: Why Write this Book?

Chapter One: Barbara M.’s Caregiving Story

Chapter Two: Barbara T.B.’s Caregiving Story

Chapter Three: Assuming Caregiving Responsibilities

Chapter Four: The Roles and Responsibilities of Caregivers

Chapter Five: The Emotional and Physical Impact of Caregiving

Chapter Six: Family Relations

Chapter Seven: Finances

Chapter Eight: Residual Difficulties

Chapter Nine: Positives and Negatives of Caregiving: Would You Do It Again?

Chapter Ten: Caregiver Recommendations

Conclusion: You Don’t Always Get What You Expect

Caregiver Questionnaire

About the Authors:

Barbara G. Matthews has had a patchwork quilt of professional career experiences.

For nearly five years, she served as an Assessor/Care Manager for the Area Agency on Aging of Dauphin County, Pennsylvania. Her main responsibility was to visit seniors in their homes to administer a comprehensive assessment, which determined their needs and eligibility for services. Matthews then “retired” to become a full-time caregiver when her mother-in-law moved into her home, an experience that motivated her to write this book.

Prior to that, Matthews was literacy coordinator for a Jobs Training Partnership Act agency. Over seven years, she was instrumental in building a thriving learning center program, which included Adult Literacy, English as a Second Language, Adult Basic Education, General Educational Development, and Adult High School Diploma programs.  She was also a Life Skills Instructor with the Dauphin County Prison for four years.

Matthews graduated from Kent State University in 1969 with a degree in Elementary Education. She also attended one year of graduate school at Kent State and was a graduate assistant in the sociology department. Her graduate education was cut short, both by the Kent State shootings of May 4, 1970, and her marriage in June of that year.

After college, Matthews taught 4th grade for a year, then began raising a family as a full-time homemaker. She returned to full-time employment when her children were in their pre-teen and teen years.

The mother of three and grandmother of nine lives in Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, with her husband of forty-three years.

Barbara Trainin Blank is an independent writer and editor who heads her own company, Blank Page Writing, now based in Maryland.

A writer for newspapers, magazines, and web sites, in areas as diverse as the arts, health and medicine, religion, and societal trends, she has contributed to Health, Emergency Medicine, Hadassah, Business2Business, and B magazines, as well as to Jewish Telegraphic Agency, Patriot-News, and Carlisle Sentinel, among others.

Trainin Blank also provides editorial services to agencies, businesses, and individuals and has edited several books, including for the U.S. Army War College, an interior designer, nonprofit consultant, and major NYC social service organization.

A graduate of Barnard College in New York City, her hometown, she also writes plays, several of which have been presented in several local and regional theaters.

Trainin Blank is married and has two children.

What to Do about Mama?: A Guide to Caring for Aging Family Members

Authored by Barbara G. Matthews & Barbara Trainin Blank

List Price: $19.95
6″ x 9″ (15.24 x 22.86 cm)
Black & White on White paper
230 pages
Sunbury Press, Inc.
ISBN-13: 978-1620063156
ISBN-10: 1620063158
BISAC: Family & Relationships / Eldercare

Soon to be availble on Kindle, Nook and Sony eReader.

For more information, please see:
http://www.sunburypressstore.com/What-to-Do-about-Mama-97…