Paul Argentini, WWII veteran, newspaperman, playwright, and novelist

VENICE, Fla.  — Sunbury Press and Random House best-selling author Paul Argentini (1926-2016) passed away on April 24, 2016. A resident of Venice, Florida, Paul was a World War II veteran Argentini_smwho was awarded the Combat Action Ribbon, and was exposed to ionizing radiation at Nagasaki, Japan. He was predeceased, in 2014, by the love of his life, wife Vera Argentini. The two teamed up for Paul’s most popular Sunbury Press title “A Treatise: The Art of Casting a Fly” (2012). Vera provided the very accurate pencil drawings of fish and flies while Paul wrote the how-to narrative.

Paul was the author of five novels published by Sunbury Press: “Charlie Caw” (2015), “The Spirit’s Cabin on Lake Eagle Talon” (2014), “A Matter of Love in the Bronx” (2013), “The Fourth Nail” (2012), and “Jim” (2011). Three more novels are under contract, including “Kiss,” “The Doubter,” and “In Time for Life,” and will be released over the next two years.

totaocaf_fcoverPaul wrote the following plays:
Full-length plays
The Decisive Point
The Secret of The Sea Island Mansion
The Essence of Being

King’s Mate- Off –Off- Off Broadway Showcase
Massachusetts Artists Foundation
Playwriting Fellowship

One Act Plays
No Gas For Nick – Berkshire Theatre Festival
Pearl Seed – Berkshire Theatre Festival
My Pen Names Mark Twain
(written and performed in sixth grade)

cc_fcTheatre Odyssey 2011 Ten-minute Play Festival
The Ordinance – First Prize Winner
Sarasota, Florida

Paul’s best-selling book published by Random House was Elements of Style for Screenwriters: The Essential Manual for Writers of Screenplays. He also co-authored, with Robert Boland, MUSICALS! Directing School and Community Theatre.

Paul was presented with the American Association for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals highest medal for crossing ice to rescue a German Shepherd that had fallen through. Paul was a chef, specializing in home-made pasta dishes, and a baker with reknown carrot and Bronx cheesecakes. He was also a cabinetmaker specializing in Queen Anne and Shaker case pieces, jazz drummer and a teacher of fly-casting. His paintings, sculptures, and photographs have been in juried art shows. He and Vera had two daughters, Lisa and Mona.

Following is a radio interview with Paul:

https://www.mixcloud.com/RadioEarNetwork/paul-argentini-o…

teosIn the interview, when asked why he became a writer, Paul stated, “I realized it was the only thing I could do well.”

“Paul always had a great sense of humor,” said publisher Lawrence Knorr of Sunbury Press. “He was a very talented and dedicated writer. We are honored to continue publishing his work and hope to see one or more of the novels made into films.”

For more information, please see:
https://paulargentini.wordpress.com/

2nd edition of "Amelia Earhart: The Truth at Last" contains new and updated information

JACKSONVILLE, Fla. — Sunbury Press has released an updated second edition of Jacksonville native Mike Campbell’s classic Amelia Earhart: The Truth at Last, the seminal work about the fate of the famed aviatrix.

About the Book:
amelia fcover 2Nearly everything the American public has seen, read and heard in the media for nearly eighty years about the so-called Amelia Earhart mystery is intentionally false or inadvertently misleading. The widely accepted myth that the disappearance of Amelia Earhart and Fred Noonan during their ill-fated world-flight attempt in July 1937 is among the greatest aviation mysteries of the 20th century is an abject lie, the result of decades of government propaganda that continues unabated to this day.

The Second Edition of Amelia Earhart: The Truth at Last adds two chapters, a new foreword, rarely seen photos, and the most recent discoveries and analysis to the mountain of overwhelming witness testimony and documentation presented in the first edition of Truth at Last. The result is the most compelling, comprehensive presentation of the indisputable facts that reveal the stark truth about the Marshall Islands and Saipan presence and deaths of Amelia Earhart and Fred Noonan – a tragic story that American’s ruling class still doesn’t want the public to know, for reasons revealed in Amelia Earhart: The Truth at Last.

Amelia Earhart: The Truth at Last dismantles and debunks the popular theories that Amelia Earhart’s Electra crashed and sank off Howland Island on July 2, 1937, or landed at Gardner Island, now Nikumaroro, where the suddenly helpless fliers died of starvation on an island teeming with food sources.

The Truth at Last presents many remarkable new findings, eyewitness accounts and never published revelations from unimpeachable sources including three famous U.S. flag officers and iconic newsman and Earhart researcher Fred Goerner’s files that reveal the truth about Amelia’s death on Saipan, as well as the sacred cow status of this matter within the U.S. government and media establishment.

The Truth at Last answers the big questions about the disappearance of Amelia Earhart, leaves no doubt about what happened to the doomed fliers, and is destined to take its rightful place as the definitive Earhart work.

Contents:
Introduction
Birth of a Legend
The Final Flight
The Search and the Radio Signals
Saipan, Thomas E. Devine, and NR 16020
The Saipan Witnesses
The Way to the Marshalls
The Marshall Islands Witnesses
Goerner’s Reversal and Devine’s Dissent
Saipan Veterans Come Forward
Earskin J. Nabers: The Unknown Eyewitness
Nabers and the Forrestal Connection
Gravesites
Griswold, Henson, and Burks
The Care and Nurture of a Sacred Cow
The Establishment’s Contempt for the Truth
Conclusion

About the Author:

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Mike Campbell spent nine years as an active-duty Navy print and broadcast journalist and 21 years as a Navy civilian writer and Air Force public affairs officer, retiring from federal service in 2008. Originally from College Park, Maryland, he is a 1974 graduate of the University of Maryland.

After meeting Thomas E. Devine, author of EYEWITNESS:  The Amelia Earhart Incident in 1988, Campbell became convinced that Devine, Fred Goerner, Paul Briand Jr., and other Earhart researchers were correct when they proclaimed the presence and death of Amelia Earhart and Fred Noonan on Saipan after their disappearance in July 1937. Fourteen years of collaboration with Devine producedWith Our Own Eyes: Eyewitnesses to the Final Days of Amelia Earhart, published in 2002 by a small Ohio company.

His second book on the Earhart case, Amelia Earhart: The Truth at Last,published in June 2012, greatly expands upon the important eyewitness accounts of former American GIs who participated in the 1944 Battle of Saipan presented in With Our Own Eyes. According to Campbell, Truth at Last is the most focused, strident and compelling case for Earhart and Noonan’s Marshall Islands landing, followed by their deaths on Saipan ever written.

In addition to bringing together all the significant eyewitness and other witness accounts gathered by a multitude of investigators for the first time, Truth at Last presents many new findings, testimony and analysis, as well as never-before-published information from the late Fred Goerner’s forgotten files that reveals the ongoing, institutionalized cover-up of the truth about Amelia’s fate at the highest levels of the U.S. government.

Amelia Earhart:The Truth at Last, completely debunks both the anachronistic, 78-year-old Navy-Coast Guard verdicts that Amelia Earhart’s Electra, NR 16020, crashed and sank in the central Pacific off Howland Island on July 2, 1937, as well as the currently fashionable falsehood that the fliers landed on Nikumaroro in the Phoenix Islands, where they perished from starvation.

He lives in north Jacksonville, Fla., with his wife, Nee and his cats.

Amelia Earhart: The Truth at Last: Second Edition
Authored by Mike Campbell
List Price: $19.95
7″ x 10″ (17.78 x 25.4 cm)
Black & White on White paper
380 pages
Sunbury Press, Inc.
ISBN-13: 978-1620066683
ISBN-10: 1620066688
BISAC: Transportation / Aviation / History

For more information, please see:
http://www.sunburypressstore.com/Amelia-Earhart-The-Truth…

Gruesome murders at Oak Hammock Park in Port St. Lucie, Florida

PORT ST. LUCIE, Fla.Oct. 24, 2015PRLog — Sunbury Press has released Keith Rommel’s second installment about the Devil Tree entitledThe Devil Tree II: The Calling, a super-natural thriller.

tdt2_fcWhat drives someone to kill? Is it something within them, or an outside force that influences them?

One of Florida’s most overlooked serial killers (Gerard John Schaefer) wrought havoc along the Treasure Coast and Hutchinson Island in the 1970s. His reign of terror consisted of unspeakable acts of torture, rape, and murder by an ancient oak tree. He hanged people there, buried their bodies, and came back often to pillage what remained. It is believed that Schaefer’s evil seeped into the tree and surrounding area, leaving a blemish on the otherwise beautiful nature walk in Oak Hammock Park in Port Saint Lucie. When night descends around the tree, the atmosphere changes completely; hundreds of stories are offered up about personal experiences of a true-life haunting.

Continuing with the legend that is pulled into modern day, Satanists commune by the tree in honor of their fallen idol. Terrible things happen around the tree, which seems to have a certain allure to it . . . making peoplecommit unimaginable acts.

This sick and grizzly legend is so deep, so convoluted and wicked, you won’t believe what you read. Whatever you do, don’t visit the Devil Tree after dusk. You will never be the same. This is not just a blurb for the back of a book, but a warning from many people–including uniformed officers who have come forth to share their experiences at the tree. I have seen both confusion and truth in their eyes.

This is a must-read series for all Floridians and those intrigued by legends, the supernatural, and the occult.

EXCERPT:

tgt2_bandThe big oak tree remained firmly planted in the soil and blocked out the moonlight with its thick overhead canopy draped in Spanish moss. It towered there like a sentinel of bad omens with a history it didn’t ask for and a reputation it couldn’t shake.

A dozen people gathered around, all dressed in long black robes with silk, ropelike belts with tassels and red plastic masks to disguise their faces. Two from the group placed candles around the tree and one followed behind them, lighting the candles. The flicker of candlelight added to the eerie scene that had begun to play out.

Everyone backed away and two others stepped forward. Unlike the others, their masks were white with a bloody teardrop underneath the left eyehole. They brushed away the leaves and acorns that covered the forest floor, sat down on the cool ground, and set a Ouija board between them.

Gentle fingers rested on the planchette, the small, heart-shaped movable indicator, and everyone around remained perfectly quiet. Palpable tension hung in the air as if something wicked shushed everyone with the promise of something terrible to come. The onlookers waited while the two chosen ones who had been called forth spoke to the Ouija board. With that, the ritual had begun.

“We have come here and gathered for you, and we respectfully ask that you give us a sign of your presence,” a male voice said, muted by the mask without a mouth hole.

The planchette started to move slowly, without purpose, and the leaders stared at each other.

“Have you been expecting us?” the female said and shook her masked head.

The Devil Tree II: The Calling
Authored by Keith Rommel
List Price: $19.95
6″ x 9″ (15.24 x 22.86 cm)
Black & White on White paper
202 pages
Sunbury Press, Inc.
ISBN-13: 978-1620066522
ISBN-10: 1620066521
BISAC: Fiction / Thrillers / Supernatural

For more information, please see:
http://www.sunburypressstore.com/The-Devil-Tree-II-The-Ca…

Keith Rommel's "The Devil Tree" based on Port St. Lucie's legend

PORT ST. LUCIE, Fla.Keith Rommel’s latest novel, The Devil Tree, based on the Port St. Lucie, Florida legend is has been released in hardcover.

tdt_fcAbout the Book:
Back in the 1970s, a series of bizarre incidents occurred at what has since been known as “The Devil Tree.”  Beneath this ancient denizen, evil was wrought by a sick serial killer, calling upon forces most evil and dark.  People were hung there … and bodies buried there … exhumed by the police.  Overcome by superstition, some tried to cut down the tree, to no avail.  Since then, it has stood in a remote section of a local park — left to its own devices — quiet in its eerie repose — until now!

Best-selling psychological-thriller author Keith Rommel has imagined the whole tale anew. He’s brought the tree to life and retold the tale with gory detail only possible in a fiction novel. Action-packed, with spine-tingling detail, this thriller is beyond parallel in the ground it uncovers … one author’s explanation of what may have really been said — what may have really happened — under Port St. Lucie’s “Devil Tree.”

Excerpt:
PICNIC
The past.
The big oak tree had crooked limbs that reached for the sky and a trunk over twenty feet in circumference. The thick canopy above blocked the midday sun, making the air seem ten degrees cooler than the scorching ninety-degree heat beating down from the hot Florida rays.

Port Saint Lucie was a quiet town and seemed to be a world within its own. Dirt roads and cheap housing had the allure to invite northern folks in hopes of escaping the bustle of city life, high costs of living, and the brutal cold winters that took their toll on the mind, body, and spirit.

For Marion, so far the change of pace was nothing short of perfect. The house she lived in was beautiful, her neighbors were pleasant; the air seemed cleaner and the sky a different kind of blue.

Looking at the ground surrounding the oak tree, she thought it the ideal spot to have a picnic with her two children, Bobby and Judy. She had Bobby carry the white and red checkered sheet, which was folded into a neat and manageable square. Judy helped by carrying the wicker picnic basket but struggled with the weight. Neither her mother or her brother offered to help her because she insisted she could do it and didn’t want help from anyone. Headstrong and full of temper, she was a handful.

Marion fiddled with a transistor radio and tried to get a clear signal so they could listen to music while they spent some quality family time on this perfect day out.

“Right here,” Marion said to Bobby, pointing at the flat ground underneath the giant oak. She mopped the sweat from her brow and looked up the hulking trunk and into the intricate weave of branches that was marvelous to the eyes. Spanish moss hung down, and if it wasn’t daytime the oak might have left the impression of a creepy Halloween prop.

Bobby placed the blanket down and did a fine job of getting all the wrinkles out of it. Marion assisted Judy in placing the basket down on the corner of the blanket, and although she didn’t say so, Marion thought she was thankful for the assistance.

She kicked off her shoes and stepped onto the squares and sat cross-legged. The ground was soft enough, and a coolness from the soil seeped up through the blanket, adding to the relief of being out of the direct sunlight.

“Yes, this is perfect,” Marion said, and the radio caught the marvelous chorus of “Norwegian Wood” by The Beatles. “Put your shoes off to the side before you step on the blanket,” she told the children. “I don’t want you tracking dirt all over the place before we eat.”

The kids did as they were told and Marion looked around, admiring the spot she had chosen. It was the first time she had been to this particular part of town and was glad she’d come across it. She had seen a couple of fishermen on her way in, tugging on the invisible lines they had cast and drinking Blue Ribbon beer. The men had looked over their shoulders at the sound of her car, but she had pulled far enough into the oversized lot that she couldn’t see them from her space.

The water in the canal looked clean enough to cool their feet if they needed, and the flow of water was slow enough that it posed little to no threat of sweeping them away. But she would decide whether or not they would go into the canal after the children had eaten and if they behaved well enough.

Bobby and Judy sat on the blanket, their legs folded Indian-style just like their mother. Bobby’s face lit up as he admired the giant oak and the things that dangled over him.

“Do you think I can climb it when we’re done eating?”

Marion thought about it. There was no question the tree was strong enough to hold him. But the sharp angles of the branches and clumps of Spanish moss made her nervous. She’d heard something about there being chiggers in moss. Despite the warm weather, she shivered just thinking about those nasty biting mites.

“I don’t know, Bobby, let Mommy think about it,” she said but already knew the answer to be no. She just didn’t want to start the picnic on a negative. “Let’s eat some lunch then afterward I’d like to go down to the water there and have a look. Maybe we can get our feet wet.”

“Neat, Mom,” Bobby said.

Static filled the Zenith 500 transistor radio, and Marion fiddled with the small dial, delicately turning it until the tuning was sharp. The Beatles came back to life and she couldn’t help but sing along in an emotional whisper.

She opened the basket and handed Bobby and Judy their bologna sandwiches, which were cut into fours. The children placed them into their laps and ate neatly and with manners.

“How did you find this place, Mom? It’s really neat,” Bobby said and was unable to keep his eyes out of the canopy. The tree seemed to invite him up the hefty trunk and into the tangle of branches. The vantage point from up there must be spectacular, he thought, and he bit into his sandwich with an ailing whine in an attempt to sway his mother’s thinking.

Marion ignored him and continued to take in her surroundings. Their 1966 Studebaker Wagonaire was parked about thirty yards away, cooking in the midday heat. She grabbed her own sandwich and unfolded the foil. As she sat there, taking tiny bites, a sudden chill rocked her body. The cold that came up through the ground and the shade of the giant oak maybe took away too much of the warmth, she decided. Marion looked at her children with the flesh goosed on her arms.

“Are you guys cold at all?”

“No,” Judy said. “It’s nice here. I like it, Mommy.”

“Yeah, Mom, it’s really neat here.”

The Devil Tree
Authored by Keith Rommel

List Price: $29.95
6″ x 9″ (15.24 x 22.86 cm)
Black & White on White paper
192 pages
Sunbury Press, Inc.
ISBN-13: 978-1620065884
ISBN-10: 1620065880
BISAC: Fiction / Occult & Supernatural

For more information, please see:
http://www.sunburypressstore.com/The-Devil-Tree-9781620065884.htm

Port St. Lucie's legendary Devil Tree subject of new Keith Rommel thriller

PORT ST. LUCIE, Fla.Keith Rommel’s latest novel, The Devil Tree, based on the Port St. Lucie, Florida legend is now available for pre-order on the Kindle platform.

tdt_fcAbout the Book:
Back in the 1970s, a series of bizarre incidents occurred at what has since been known as “The Devil Tree.”  Beneath this ancient denizen, evil was wrought by a sick serial killer, calling upon forces most evil and dark.  People were hung there … and bodies buried there … exhumed by the police.  Overcome by superstition, some tried to cut down the tree, to no avail.  Since then, it has stood in a remote section of a local park — left to its own devices — quiet in its eerie repose — until now!

Best-selling psychological-thriller author Keith Rommel has imagined the whole tale anew. He’s brought the tree to life and retold the tale with gory detail only possible in a fiction novel. Action-packed, with spine-tingling detail, this thriller is beyond parallel in the ground it uncovers … one author’s explanation of what may have really been said — what may have really happened — under Port St. Lucie’s “Devil Tree.”

Excerpt:
PICNIC
The past.
The big oak tree had crooked limbs that reached for the sky and a trunk over twenty feet in circumference. The thick canopy above blocked the midday sun, making the air seem ten degrees cooler than the scorching ninety-degree heat beating down from the hot Florida rays.

Port Saint Lucie was a quiet town and seemed to be a world within its own. Dirt roads and cheap housing had the allure to invite northern folks in hopes of escaping the bustle of city life, high costs of living, and the brutal cold winters that took their toll on the mind, body, and spirit.

For Marion, so far the change of pace was nothing short of perfect. The house she lived in was beautiful, her neighbors were pleasant; the air seemed cleaner and the sky a different kind of blue.

Looking at the ground surrounding the oak tree, she thought it the ideal spot to have a picnic with her two children, Bobby and Judy. She had Bobby carry the white and red checkered sheet, which was folded into a neat and manageable square. Judy helped by carrying the wicker picnic basket but struggled with the weight. Neither her mother or her brother offered to help her because she insisted she could do it and didn’t want help from anyone. Headstrong and full of temper, she was a handful.

Marion fiddled with a transistor radio and tried to get a clear signal so they could listen to music while they spent some quality family time on this perfect day out.

“Right here,” Marion said to Bobby, pointing at the flat ground underneath the giant oak. She mopped the sweat from her brow and looked up the hulking trunk and into the intricate weave of branches that was marvelous to the eyes. Spanish moss hung down, and if it wasn’t daytime the oak might have left the impression of a creepy Halloween prop.

Bobby placed the blanket down and did a fine job of getting all the wrinkles out of it. Marion assisted Judy in placing the basket down on the corner of the blanket, and although she didn’t say so, Marion thought she was thankful for the assistance.

She kicked off her shoes and stepped onto the squares and sat cross-legged. The ground was soft enough, and a coolness from the soil seeped up through the blanket, adding to the relief of being out of the direct sunlight.

“Yes, this is perfect,” Marion said, and the radio caught the marvelous chorus of “Norwegian Wood” by The Beatles. “Put your shoes off to the side before you step on the blanket,” she told the children. “I don’t want you tracking dirt all over the place before we eat.”

The kids did as they were told and Marion looked around, admiring the spot she had chosen. It was the first time she had been to this particular part of town and was glad she’d come across it. She had seen a couple of fishermen on her way in, tugging on the invisible lines they had cast and drinking Blue Ribbon beer. The men had looked over their shoulders at the sound of her car, but she had pulled far enough into the oversized lot that she couldn’t see them from her space.

The water in the canal looked clean enough to cool their feet if they needed, and the flow of water was slow enough that it posed little to no threat of sweeping them away. But she would decide whether or not they would go into the canal after the children had eaten and if they behaved well enough.

Bobby and Judy sat on the blanket, their legs folded Indian-style just like their mother. Bobby’s face lit up as he admired the giant oak and the things that dangled over him.

“Do you think I can climb it when we’re done eating?”

Marion thought about it. There was no question the tree was strong enough to hold him. But the sharp angles of the branches and clumps of Spanish moss made her nervous. She’d heard something about there being chiggers in moss. Despite the warm weather, she shivered just thinking about those nasty biting mites.

“I don’t know, Bobby, let Mommy think about it,” she said but already knew the answer to be no. She just didn’t want to start the picnic on a negative. “Let’s eat some lunch then afterward I’d like to go down to the water there and have a look. Maybe we can get our feet wet.”

“Neat, Mom,” Bobby said.

Static filled the Zenith 500 transistor radio, and Marion fiddled with the small dial, delicately turning it until the tuning was sharp. The Beatles came back to life and she couldn’t help but sing along in an emotional whisper.

She opened the basket and handed Bobby and Judy their bologna sandwiches, which were cut into fours. The children placed them into their laps and ate neatly and with manners.

“How did you find this place, Mom? It’s really neat,” Bobby said and was unable to keep his eyes out of the canopy. The tree seemed to invite him up the hefty trunk and into the tangle of branches. The vantage point from up there must be spectacular, he thought, and he bit into his sandwich with an ailing whine in an attempt to sway his mother’s thinking.

Marion ignored him and continued to take in her surroundings. Their 1966 Studebaker Wagonaire was parked about thirty yards away, cooking in the midday heat. She grabbed her own sandwich and unfolded the foil. As she sat there, taking tiny bites, a sudden chill rocked her body. The cold that came up through the ground and the shade of the giant oak maybe took away too much of the warmth, she decided. Marion looked at her children with the flesh goosed on her arms.

“Are you guys cold at all?”

“No,” Judy said. “It’s nice here. I like it, Mommy.”

“Yeah, Mom, it’s really neat here.”

The Devil Tree
Authored by Keith Rommel
List Price: $7.99
Kindle platform
BISAC: Fiction / Thriller

For more information, please see:
http://www.amazon.com/Devil-Tree-Keith-Rommel-ebook/dp/B0…