The St. Louis Jewish Light newspaper recognizes veterans’ stories

he St. Louis Jewish Light newspaper about Joe Regenbogen's nonfiction book, The Boys of Brookdale.

The St. Louis Jewish Light inspires their local community with their news and information. They are the award-winning newspaper of the Jewish community for St. Louis, and they publish print editions as well as online. With their motto being "Connecting the Community," The Light serves Regenbogen's book well for St. Louis.

The Boys of Brookdale tells of 16 stories from veterans living in a nursing home located in St. Louis. 

To read the review:

The Light

To purchase The Boys of Brookdale:

Sunbury Press Store

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The St. Louis Post-Dispatch Reviews the Story of World War II Veterans!

The St. Louis Post-Dispatch is known as the No. 1 St. Louis site for news, sports, and entertainment. Their website offers local breaking news, information, and special reports.

The Boys of Brookdale makes a good fit for their bookshelf of reviews because the nursing home where Joe Regenbogen interviewed the featured Veterans is located in St. Louis. Regenbogen's book tells the story of 16 Veterans, who lived through the Second World War. Levins, the reviewer, comments how people should cherish these 16 stories in Regenbogen's novel since three of the Veterans have unfortunately now passed.

Regenbogen also explained how these Veterans take great pride in knowing their story is being told to others.

To read the review and learn more information on the book:

St. Louis Post-Dispatch

 

To purchase:

Sunbury Press Store

 

 

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Regenbogen interviews WW2 from same nursing home

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Discover 16 Brookdale residents, who survived through World War II, and learn of the Holocaust, prisoners, aviation, and other battles. 

The author seeks media interviews on this important topic or reviews or mentions of his book in the media.

Book overview

Sixteen Amazing Stories from the Second World War Discovered in One Senior-Living Facility.

Of the 16 million people who served in the Second World War, perhaps less than half a million are still alive (as of this writing). Regrettably, these veterans are currently dying at a rate of approximately 500 per day. Brookdale Creve Coeur is a local senior living facility in the suburbs of St. Louis that houses a number of these veterans. It also happens to be where the author's 85-year-old father recently moved. Places like Brookdale contain a treasure trove of remarkable and inspiring stories from World War Two.

For this book, the author interviewed 16 Brookdale residents with memories from the Second World War and have written their stories into the chapters of this book. Among their accounts are a B-24 pilot shot down over the Pacific, two veterans from the Battle of the Bulge, a WAVE, a prisoner-of-war, and a Holocaust survivor.

 

About the Author

Joe Regenbogen is currently a retired high school history teacher. For the last four years, however, he has continued teaching American History part-time in a program for exceptionally gifted 7th and 8th-grade students. At the end of their two years with Joe, these students take the AP exam in U.S. History and so far, they have all done well enough to earn college credit. Since Joe no longer teaches all day, he has taken up writing as a rewarding way to spend his extra time. Vernon Press published his first book entitled Questioning History.

Book review

The Boys of Brookdale

Outstanding book! You won't be able to put it down! Wonderful stories of 16 WW II Veterans (living at Brookdale along with the authors father) who share their experiences and life lessons…”

~ Review from Sunburypress.com

To purchase

Sunbury Press Store

Amazon

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by Joe Regenbogen

SUNBURY PRESS

Trade paperback - 6 x 9 x 2

9781620061800

218 Pages

HISTORY / Military / World War II

BIOGRAPHY & AUTOBIOGRAPHY / Military

 

For publicity information, contact:
publicity@sunburypress.com

The Joes visit famous graves in the big city

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When Joe Farrell and Joe Farley researched Pennsylvania graves, an old movie inspired them to shed light on the graves of famous people in New York.

Book overview:

The Joes ventured to the Big Apple and its boroughs to visit the graves of the rich, famous, and infamous.

This first volume of the Gotham Graves series focuses on those persons famous in and around New York City who were fascinating figures in their times, such as:

  • Louis Armstrong
  • Anne Bancroft
  • Nellie Bly
  • Jim Farley
  • ...& more!

This second volume of the Gotham Graves series focuses on those persons interred in and around New York City who were interesting figures in their times, such as:

  • "Gentleman Jim" Corbett
  • Andrew Carnegie
  • Irving Berlin
  • Lou Gehrig
  • ...& more!

Farrell and Farley have combed New York City to bring you the most entertaining biographies about interesting people buried in New York.

Book review:

"I might sound a bit strange, but have always found a sort of peace walking through graveyards and reading the headstones of all who have gone before me. I try to read as many books as I can find on graveyards and cemeteries, and people’s final resting places, so this book was of special interest. Not to play favorites, but the one who got my attention in this book was Dorothy Kilgallen. I’ve always been interested in her life, and also supposedly controversial death. Thank you to Netgalley and Sunbury Press, Inc for an ARC of this book."

~ Julie, Amazon costumer

About the author:

In 1975, Joe Farrell hired Mr. Farley to work in the Governor’s Action Center. Nine years later Farrell would repeat his mistake by hiring Mr. Farley to work for him at the Public Utility Commission. On May 21, 2010, after 35 years of state service he retired. Mr. Farley has not returned to work because he has been unable to find a cushy high paying position like Joe Farrell’s. In addition, Mr. Farrell has apparently learned from his past mistakes as he has not attempted to hire Mr. Farley a third time. As a result, Mr. Farley has concentrated his efforts at co-authoring his books Keystone Tombstones.

 

To learn more about the authors:

Authors

To purchase:

Volume 1:

Sunbury Press Store

Amazon

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Volume 2:

Sunbury Press Store

Amazon

Barnes & Noble

 

For publicity information, contact:
publicity@sunburypress.com

Coast to Coast Newspaper talks of “R.E.M.F. – Vietnam’s Other GIs”

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Coast to Coast Newspaper publishes a compelling review of R.E.M.F. - Vietnam's Other GIs, written by John VanDevanter Carter.

Roberta Deen, from Coast to Coast Newspaper, recently published her review of John VanDevanter Carter's book, R.E.M.F. - Vietnam's Other GIs. This is a nonfiction, historical novel about the Vietnam war.

She names R.E.M.F. - Vietnam's Other GIs as a "page-turner" after finishing the book herself.

Be sure to check out her review-

CC Newspaper - Review

To purchase, use these links:

Sunbury Press Store

Amazon

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Hawley thinks he has proven Dr. Tumblety was Jack the Ripper

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Jack the Ripper, the (unfortunately) famous serial killer of the Whitechapel area, gets a new name in Michael Hawley's evidence-packed book, Jack the Ripper Suspect Dr. Francis Tumblety.

Book overview:

Jack the Ripper Suspect Dr. Francis Tumblety highlights the most recent groundbreaking discoveries concerning one of Scotland Yard’s top Jack the Ripper suspects in the 1888 Whitechapel Murders Investigation, Dr. Francis Tumblety. Among the discoveries is over 700 pages of never-seen-before sworn testimonies revealing not only a picture of an antisocial narcissist with a single-minded lifelong drive for exploitation but also damning evidence that he may indeed have been the Whitechapel fiend.

Book review:

"...Michael Hawley has outdone himself...this is not just a reprinting of his last book with an extra chapter this is a whole new book with a virtual mountain of newly discovered material (including the discovery of over 700 pages of testimony regarding Dr. Tumblety after his death!!). It paints a much clearer picture of the mind of this unusual but fascinating "man."

Michael gives us an almost complete account of the whereabouts of Tumblety during and after the autumn of terror and paints a compelling argument that it is possible that Dr. Tumblety and Jack the Ripper may be one in the same.

...

It can be difficult to read about such an un-likeable figure, but Hawley keeps the reader fascinated by not only the style in which he writes (academic yet enthralling) but by the sheer amount of information, so much of it new to even the staunchest ‘Ripperologist’ or true crime enthusiast. This will be a book researchers will keep at their side for years to come....a perfect example of allowing the FACTS and EVIDENCE to tell the story..not the writers personal views...hats off to Michael for that.

This may be the best ‘Ripper’ book in a decade...and that is saying a lot considering the amazing work done by such fantastic writers and historians like A.J Griffith and Tom Wescott..5 stars doesn't seem like enough."

~ Brian Young, five star review on Amazon

 

About the author:

Michael Hawley has published over a dozen research articles in journals dedicated to the Whitechapel murders/Jack the Ripper mystery, namely Ripperologist, Whitechapel Society Journal, Casebook Examiner, and The Dagger, and published online articles for numerous websites. He was awarded Article of the Year for 2016 for the most popular Jack the Ripper website, which is based out of London, England. He was honored to lecture at the Jack the Ripper Conference (RipperCon) in Baltimore, Maryland, in April 2016, and the Jack the Ripper Conference in Liverpool, England, in September 2017. Hawley is the author of The Ripper’s Haunts (Nonfiction, 2016) with the top book reviewer and author, Paul Begg, stating, “Hawley’s Magnum Opus” is “head and shoulders above the new Ripper offerings in 2016,” and “for that matter, 2015.” He was honored to be interviewed in two separate podcasts for Rippercast. He is also the author of The Watchmaker Revelations, a mystery/thriller fiction trilogy: The Ripper’s Hellbroth, Jack’s Lantern, and Curse of the Bayou Beast. He is also the author of Searching for Truth with a Broken Flashlight (Nonfiction, 2010), which was awarded June 2011 Book of the Month for the mega-website, ReligiousTolerance.org, and was the subject of an article in the Buffalo Spree, June 2011. Hawley holds a Master’s degree in science (invertebrate paleontology) and secondary science education at State University of New York, College of Buffalo, and a Bachelor’s degree in geology and geophysics at Michigan State University. He was a commander and naval aviator in the U.S. Navy (retired), and is currently enjoying a career as a secondary earth science and chemistry teacher. He resides with his wife and six children in Greater Buffalo, New York.

 

To purchase:

Sunbury Press Store

Amazon

Barnes & Noble

 

by Michael Hawley

SUNBURY PRESS

Trade Paperback - 6 x 9 x 1

9781620068199

296 pages

TRUE CRIME / Murder / Serial Killers

HISTORY / Europe / Great Britain / Victorian Era

HISTORY / United States / 19th Century

 

For publicity information, contact:
publicity@sunburypress.com

Sunbury Press Releases “German Prisoners of War at Camp Cooke, California,” by Jeffrey E. Geiger

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Sunbury Press is proud to announce the release of German Prisoners of War at Camp Cooke, California. It comes on the 75th anniversary of the first large wave of German POWs to arrive in America in 1943.

About the Book: Hitler’s soldier’s came to America not as goose-stepping conquering heroes, but as prisoners of war. By the time World War II ended in 1945, more than six hundred POW camps had sprung up across America holding a total of 371,683 German POWs. One of these camps was established at the U.S. Army’s training installation Camp Cooke on June 16, 1944.

The POW base camp at Cooke operated sixteen branch camps in six of California’s fifty-eight counties and is today the site of Vandenberg Air Force Base in Santa Barbara County. Compared to other prisoner of war camps in California, Camp Cooke generally held the largest number of German POWs and operated the most branch camps in the state.

A large number of the prisoners were from Field Marshal Erwin Rommel’s Afrika Korps, as well as from other military formations. Under the terms of the Geneva Convention, the prisoners received comfortable quarters and excellent care. They filled massive wartime labor shortages inside the main Army post at Cooke and in the private sector, mostly performing agricultural work for which they were paid. On weekends and evenings, they enjoyed many recreational entertainment and educational opportunities available to them in the camp. For many POWs, the American experience helped reshape their worldview and gave them a profound appreciation of American democracy.

This book is the compelling story of fourteen German soldiers who were captured during the campaigns in North Africa and Europe, and then waited out the remainder of the war as POWs in California. It is a firsthand account of life as a POW at Camp Cooke and the lasting impression it had on the prisoners.

Book review:

"This is one of the best books that you will ever read about the German POW experience in America.I purchased my copy at the author's book discussion. Mr. Geiger gives his interviews full reign to discuss their experiences as soldiers in the Third Reich and their recollections as prisoners of war, while gently asking probing questions that elicit fascinating morsels of information. For instance, the terrible food supply in the German army, Nazi propaganda that claimed the Luftwaffe had bombed America; and hardcore Nazis intimidating fellow prisoners. Then there are instances of humanity between "enemies" such as when prisoners returned the rifles to the guard who has forgotten them while watching the POWs harvest crops; and the guards who handed his rifle to one of the prisoners when he had to relieve himself behind a bush. These are just a few of the anecdotes that make this book so fascinating. As I read each man's account, I began to feel as if I knew him personally. The excellent collection of illustrations adds to the feeling of being in the camp. The last chapter of this book should be read and studied by anyone who thinks that war is fun. These old warriors, who experienced the tragedies of war, share their views on how senseless it all was. This book review is for the expanded second edition of the book, published in 2018."

~ Joan Pirtle, five star Amazon review

Softcover 6 x 9

280 pages with more than 50 vintage photos

ISBN: 9781620067505 (softcover). Suggested retail price $19.95

ISBN: 978-1-62006-751-2 (eBook)

 

About the Author

Jeffrey E. Geiger is a retired professional historian. He is the author of Camp Cooke and Vandenberg Air Force Base, 1941-1966, and has published articles in magazines and newspapers.

 

To purchase:

Sunbury Press Store

Amazon

Barnes & Noble

 

Contact

sunburypress.com

Toll-Free Phone: (855) 338-8359

orders@sunburypress.com

 

The book is also available from all booksellers as well as autographed copies directly from the author at:

germanpowbook@gmail.com

Life on the front lines in Vietnam — 50 years ago

"What you read in these pages is what I remember-- every day."

~ Charles Kniffen, author

 

Charles Kniffen's true story reveals the lasting hardships and struggles of combat, even fifty years later. Seven months of combat in Vietnam transformed to hurtful, unforgettable effects for Kniffen and his loved ones. Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder, PTSD, can rule Kniffen's life. Now, he reveals this unfair ruling through Fifty Years in a Foxhole.

Book overview:

Fifty Years in a Foxhole is an episodic account of the author's seven months in combat in Vietnam. He and his platoon were in several major engagements including the Battle of the Hills and Operation Utah. The main focus of these operations are the lives of the marines and attrition through action and "friendly fire" as they endure these pointless dangers.

Each chapter contains two parts, and the second part is about the author's fifty years of living with undiagnosed PTSD. He struggled to find a way to live in the thrall of the existential elan he developed in combat while insisting that this edgy verve could be enjoyed without the constant threat of fear, violence, and death. It explores PTSD from a new perspective, more as a shared betrayal with many other people in our society.

Book review:

"Charles Kniffen is a natural writer - the words just flow. Intense, to be sure, but also compelling. He tells the story of his time in Vietnam, and what followed that time. They say "war is hell" but just because the war ends does not mean the warriors can ever come home, at least not as the same person. If I say any more I'll say too much, and not as well as Kniffen does."

~ John D. Rule, Amazon Customer

 

About the author:

Charles Kniffen is a combat wounded veteran of the Vietnam war. He obtained a GED while serving in the Marine Corps and earned a Master's Degree in Philosophy from Uconn. Previous to his college education, Charles worked as a truck driver, a milkman, and a herdsman on a New England dairy farm. He was employed as a Mental Health Worker, a Licensed Social Worker, and a Vocational Rehabilitation Counselor in Albuquerque, NM. The uncontested high point in his job-hopping, entry-level career was working with autistic children to write, develop, and produce a series of puppet plays.

Charles attends a Combat Veteran's group in Machias, ME and has been an all-season solo kayaker for two decades, plying the North Atlantic from Spring Point to the Bay of Fundy. He and his wife, Rhonda Welcome are the co-owners of Turtle Dance Totems, a sea-junk assemblage art studio and they are leading a community project to recover and re-articulate the skeleton of a 55' finback whale buried in the mud flats of Mowry Beach, Lubec, Maine.

To purchase:

Sunbury Press Store

Amazon

Barnes & Noble

by Charles Kniffen

SUNBURY PRESS

Trade paperback - 6 x 9 x .8

9781620061602

265 Pages

BIOGRAPHY & AUTOBIOGRAPHY / Military

HISTORY / Military / Vietnam War

HISTORY / United States / 20th Century

For publicity information, contact:
publicity@sunburypress.com

An unlikely love story set during the final collapse of medieval Islamic Spain

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"Extensively researched and beautifully written, Cressler's novel leads us into an exotic world of love, ghosts, intrigue, and betrayal. A must-read for all lovers of historical fiction." - Joan Fallon, author of the Al-Andalus Series

The focus of John D. Cressler's fiction includes strong, young women with an intent on crossing the artificial boundaries society imposes. He captures how love's power transforms us as well as the importance of religious tolerance, and the beauty of multiculturalism. Fortune's Lament is set within a riveting, historical context.

Book overview:

Much of modern Spain was under Muslim control for nearly 800 years (from 711 to 1492 C.E.). Medieval Islamic Spain was deeply influential in world history, for a multitude of reasons, including the rediscovery, translation, and dissemination of the lost works of medicine, science, and philosophy of the ancient Greeks. The Muslim Umayyads (with roots tracing back to Syria), were lovers of books and learning, and helped launch a cultural revolution in Córdoba which transformed the western world. An exceptional 200+ year period of peaceful coexistence occurred between Judaism, Christianity, and Islam under Muslim Umayyad rule, providing a powerful lesson in the practice of multiculturalism for our 21st-century world.

Fortune's Lament is the third release in the Anthems of al-Andalus series, which break open this largely forgotten and fascinating history for modern readers. All three historical novels are love stories set at pivotal moments in the history of medieval Islamic Spain. Fortune's Lament is set in Granada's Alhambra Palace, 120 years after Emeralds of the Alhambra, and tells the story of Danah, a young Muslim woman who aspires to be the first female physician in the city. Love unexpectedly blossoms between Danah and Yusef, a valiant prince of court from a rival clan, during the bloody final conquest of Granada by King Ferdinand and Queen Isabella of Christian Spain. As the light of Islamic Spain dims, the Inquisition looms large on the horizon, as does the coming voyage of Columbus to discover the Americas.

Book reviews:

"John Cressler's most recent novel is a wonderful tale that appeals to all readers. The historical context may seem to only appeal to lovers of historical fiction, but the story of love, war, betrayal, and search for self interwoven into the complex history of Muslim Spain will captivate all. I felt myself turning page after page not waning to put the novel down! It is a story that highlights the beauty of finding Great Love in life and encourages the reader to seek out that kind of love in his or her own life."

~Angela Como

About the author:

John D. Cressler is Schlumberger Chair Professor of Electronics in the School of Electrical and Computer Engineering at Georgia Tech, Atlanta, Georgia, USA. He received his Ph.D. from Columbia University, New York, in 1990. His academic research interests center on the creative use of nanoscale-engineering techniques to enable new approaches to electronic devices, circuits and systems.

Dr. Cressler and his students have published over 600 scientific papers in this field and he has received a number of awards for both his teaching and his research, including the 2010 Class of 1940 W. Howard Ector Outstanding Teacher Award (Georgia Tech's top teaching honor) and the 2013 Class of 1934 Distinguished Professor Award (the highest honor that can be bestowed on a faculty member at Georgia Tech).

To purchase:

Sunbury Press Store

Amazon

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by John D. Cressler
MILFORD HOUSE PRESS
Trade Paperback - 6 x 9 x 1.4
9781620063729
602 Pages with maps and photographs
FICTION / Historical / Medieval
FICTION / Romance / Historical / Medieval
FICTION / Religious

For publicity information, contact:
publicity@sunburypress.com

Who killed Jack Armstrong along the Juniata River?

SUNBURY, Pa.Sunbury Press has released John L. Moore’s Bows, Bullets, and Bears, the first of eight volumes in the Frontier Pennsylvania series.

bbab_fcAbout the Book:
Jack Armstrong died violently along the Juniata River in early 1744.

Armstrong was a rough-and-tumble frontier trader whose sharp business practices antagonized one Indian too many. He and two men who worked for him traveled into the woods in early 1744 and never came out again. Word soon crossed the frontier that all three had been murdered. Obscure, but richly detailed documents tell how and why Iroquois Indians living along the Susquehanna River at present-day Sunbury developed evidence that exposed the Native Americans involved in Armstrong’s murder.

John L. Moore’s nonfiction book contains true stories of Armstrong and other real people caught up in the struggles that took place all along the Pennsylvania frontier throughout the late 1600s and 1700s. The stories are set mainly in the valleys of the Delaware, Juniata, Lehigh, Ohio and Susquehanna rivers.

Other chapters tell how:

A colonial-era witch trial.

A colonial-era witch trial.

The Philadelphia jury in Margaret Mattson’s 1683 witchcraft trail delivered a split verdict. She was acquitted of bewitching her neighbors’ cows, but found guilty of being known as a witch. Presiding over the trial was William Penn, who let Margaret go home after her husband and son posted a bond for her “good behavior.”

Moravian missionaries who traveled along the Susquehanna River’s West and North Branches during a famine in 1748 found many Indians sick with smallpox and suffering from starvation. The people in one native town were boiling tree bark for food. In another village they were cooking grass.

Early in the French & Indian War, an influential Iroquois chief known as “The Belt of Wampum” urged Pennsylvania officials to build a fort on the Susquehanna River at the native town called Shamokin, present-day Sunbury. “Such Indians as continue true to you want a place to come to and to live in security,” The Belt said in early 1756.

Frances Slocum, a small girl kidnapped by Indians from her home along the Susquehanna River during the America Revolution, spent most of her adult life as a Miami Indian. In 1839, her brother Joseph and his daughters traveled from Pennsylvania to Indiana to visit her. They traveled by stage coach, canal boat and horse-drawn railroad during their 19-day journey west.

Anecdotes throughout the book describe how Native Americans and Europeans hunted bears, ate bear meat, and used bearskins for blankets and mattresses.

Excerpt:
February 1744
By the early 1740s, an Indian trader named Jack Armstrong, who operated out of Lancaster County, had developed a reputation for employing sharp and even antagonistic practices in his dealings with the Delaware Indians who lived, hunted, and trapped along the Susquehanna and the Juniata Rivers. Some of the trader’s white friends had even cautioned him about being overly harsh with his Indian customers and especially about angering them. If Armstrong wasn’t particularly likeable, he was nevertheless a successful trader and a well-known frontier personality. But as hard and tough as Armstrong was, events that occurred along the Juniata River during early 1744 proved that one of his customers, a Delaware Indian known as John Musemeelin, was tougher, harder, and more ferocious.

Armstrong’s story begins in early 1744 when the trader and two men who worked for him, James Smith and Woodworth Arnold, loaded their string of pack horses with trade goods—gun powder, gun flints, lead bullets, glass beads, scissors, woolen blankets, combs, little bells, and other items. For such goods, native trappers would eagerly swap the skins of deer, bears, beavers, elk, otters, foxes, raccoons, and wildcats.

Shikellamy

Shikellamy

The three men headed north and followed the trail along the Susquehanna, and then, well north of present-day Harrisburg, swung west and headed out the Juniata toward the Allegheny Mountains. That was in February. By late March and early April, as spring came on, a rumor swept across the frontier: Armstrong and his men had disappeared and weren’t ever coming out of the woods.

As it turned out, all three had been murdered. Since the killings took place in Indian Country—well beyond what was then the western boundary of Pennsylvania—an Indian chief conducted the first official inquiry in the case. Indeed, records of the Pennsylvania colony contain a detailed account of this chief’s investigation into the disappearance and murder of Jack Armstrong. The account itself was dictated by Chief Shikellamy, an Oneida who represented the Iroquois Confederacy at Shamokin and who led the investigation that exposed the killer. Located at the forks of the Susquehanna River, Shamokin was the largest Indian town in what is now Pennsylvania. Shikellamy subsequently had the man arrested and incarcerated. Conrad Weiser, a Pennsylvania German who was the colony’s Indian agent, recorded Shikellamy’s narrative.

About the Author:
johnJohn L. Moore, a veteran newspaperman, said he employed a journalist’s eye for detail and ear for quotes in order to write about long-dead people in a lively way. He said his books are based on 18th and 19th century letters, journals, memoirs and transcripts of official proceedings such as interrogations, depositions and treaties.

The author is also a professional storyteller who specializes in dramatic episodes from Pennsylvania’s colonial history. Dressed in 18th century clothing, he does storytelling in the persona of “Susquehanna Jack,” a frontier ruffian. Moore is available weekdays, weekends and evenings for audiences and organizations of all types and sizes.

Moore has participated in several archaeological excavations of Native American sites. These include the Village of Nain, Bethlehem; the City Island project in Harrisburg, conducted by the Pennsylvania Historical and Museum Commission during the 1990s; and a Bloomsburg University dig in 1999 at a Native American site near Nescopeck. He also took part in a 1963 excavation conducted by the New Jersey State Museum along the Delaware River north of Worthington State Forest.

Moore’s 45-year career in journalism included stints as a reporter for The Wall Street Journal; as a Harrisburg-based legislative correspondent for Ottaway News Service; as managing editor of The Sentinel at Lewistown; as editorial page editor and managing editor at The Daily Item in Sunbury; and as editor of the Eastern Pennsylvania Business Journal in Bethlehem.

Bows, Bullets, and Bears
Authored by John L. Moore
List Price: $9.99
5″ x 8″ (12.7 x 20.32 cm)
Black & White on Cream paper
96 pages
Sunbury Press, Inc.
ISBN-13: 978-1620065112
ISBN-10: 1620065118
BISAC: History / United States / State & Local / Middle Atlantic

http://www.sunburypressstore.com/Bows-Bullets-and-Bears-9…

Cover artwork by Andrew Knez, Jr.  For more information about Andrew’s work, please see:http://www.andrewknezjr.com/