PCCA’s artistic “Downtown Details” repeats as Brown Posey Press bestseller for May

PCCA’s artistic “Downtown Details” repeats as Brown Posey Press bestseller for May

MECHANICSBURG, Pa. —  Sunbury Press has released the bestsellers list for May for its literary fiction imprint, BROWN POSEY PRESS. The Perry County Council of the Arts architectural exhibition guide Downtown Details: An Artful Perspective of Newport, Pennsylvania repeated in the top spot. San Diego’s Dennis Clausen grabbed the next two spots with his novels The Search for Judd McCarthy and The Sins of Rachel Simms. Michael Barton’s humorous fictional ethnography of the Shipoke, aka Shitepoke, a neighborhood of Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, was #4.  Sharon Marchisello’s Going Home was #4.

BROWN POSEY PRESS – Bestsellers for May 2018 (by Revenue)
Rank Prior Title Author Category
1 1 Downtown Details: An Artful Perspective of Newport, Pennsy… PCCA Architecture
2 NEW The Search for Judd McCarthy Dennis Clausen Literary Fiction
3 NEW The Sins of Rachel Simms Dennis Clausen Literary Fiction
4 3 Shitepoke Michael Barton Literary Fiction
5 4 Going Home Sharon Marchisello Murder Mystery

PCCA’s book was boosted by ongoing sales at the associated photography exhibition in Newport, Pennsylvania. Clausen’s books were helped by author activities.  Barton’s book was boosted by sales to local bookstores in the Harrisburg area. Marchisello’s title received activity due to social media mentions.

PCCA’s artistic “Downtown Details” debuts as Brown Posey Press bestseller for April

PCCA’s artistic “Downtown Details” debuts as Brown Posey Press bestseller for April

MECHANICSBURG, Pa. —  Sunbury Press has released the bestsellers list for April for its literary fiction imprint, BROWN POSEY PRESS. The Perry County Council of the Arts architectural exhibition guide Downtown Details: An Artful Perspective of Newport, Pennsylvania debuted in the top spot. Melanie Simms’paperback version of her poetry compilation about Sunbury, Pennsylvania, Remember the Sun, returned to the charts at #2. Michael Barton’s humorous fictional ethnography of the Shipoke, aka Shitepoke, a neighborhood of Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, was #3.  Sharon Marchisello’s Going Home was #4. The Heatstroke Line by Ed Rubin returned to the rankings at #5.

BROWN POSEY PRESS – Bestsellers for April 2018 (by Revenue)
Rank Prior Title Author Category
1 NEW Downtown Details: An Artful Perspective of Newport, Pennsy… PCCA Architecture
2 Remember the Sun Melanie Simms Poetry
3 1 Shitepoke Michael Barton Literary Fiction
4 Going Home Sharon Marchisello Murder Mystery
5 The Heatstroke Line Ed Rubin Climate Fiction

PCCA’s book was boosted by advance purchases in preparation for the associated photography exhibition in Newport, Pennsylvania. Simms’ book was helped by author activities.  The remaining titles received activity due to social media mentions.
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Michael Barton’s humorous “Shitepoke” debuts as Brown Posey Press bestseller for March

Michael Barton’s humorous “Shitepoke” debuts as Brown Posey Press bestseller for March

MECHANICSBURG, Pa. —  Sunbury Press has released the bestsellers list for March for its literary fiction imprint, BROWN POSEY PRESS. Michael Barton’s humorous fictional ethnography of the Shipoke, aka Shitepoke, a neighborhood of Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, ranked number one.  Tory Gates took the second position with his novel Live from the Cafe. Robert Barksy’s entertaining novel Hatched about a counterfeiting ring that starts in a gourmet restaurant in New York took the third spot. William F. Lee’s grief memoir All My Heroes Are Gone slipped to #4.

BROWN POSEY PRESS – Bestsellers for March 2018 (by Revenue)
Rank Prior Title Author Category
1 NEW Shitepoke Michael Barton Literary Fiction
2 5 Live from the Cafe Tory Gates Gay & Lesbian Fiction
3 2 Hatched Robert Barksy Literary Fiction
4 1 All My Heroes Are Gone William F Lee Grief Memoir
5 Roadman Stefan May Poetry
6 Contemporary Photo Impressionists T K McCoy Art
7 Pass the Pierogies Mike Breslin Ethnic Memoir
8 Redemption Courtney Frey Memoir
9 Sanctuary Dishonored Robin Lee Art History
10 Images of Italy T K McCoy Art

Barton’s book was boosted by initial release activity. Gates’ book was helped by his hosting of the Brown Posey Books radio podcast. Lee’s book has performed well due to author activities in his local area of Texas. Barksy’s book has been selling through online retailers. The remaining backlist titles received activity due to social media mentions.
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Carrie Wissler-Thomas recounts the history of the Art Association of Harrisburg

HARRISBURG, Pa.Sunbury Press has released Carrie Wissler Thomas’s As the Paint Dries: The History of the Art Association of Harrisburg. The author is the association’s president.

atpd_fc_3About the Book:
This history of the Art Association of Harrisburg is both a factual accounting of the story of the region’s most venerable fine arts organization, and also an often-amusing romp through the personal reminiscences of author Carrie Wissler-Thomas. The Art Association was founded by cultured civic leaders who were passionate about the visual arts, and it has continued to survive and prosper throughout eight decades due to the dedication and support of both artists and committed patrons. The history of The Art Association in many ways mirrors the history of Harrisburg, reflecting the vicissitudes of the City’s economy and development, the Renaissance of the 1980s and ‘90s, the construction of the Hilton and other prominent downtown buildings, the re-development of Reservoir Park, and the emergence of Restaurant Row. The Art Association was founded during the heyday of The City Beautiful Movement, and like The Harrisburg Symphony and Theatre Harrisburg, the organization continues to provide cultural enjoyment and opportunities for art-lovers and practitioners of all ilks.

As the Paint Dries is a phrase coined by the author’s husband Scott Thomas as the humourous title of the on-going AAH daily soap-opera. The Art Association of Harrisburg is a family, a reality show, a visual feast and a very human comedy. The AAH story is a rich tapestry, filled with serious episodes  punctuated by incredible-but-true anecdotes. Most of all, the AAH story is the story of the people who have made it what it is today, and who continue to guide it into the future.

"Lady in Black" by Lavery

Excerpt:
(From the chapter AAH Exhibitions Through the Early Years: 1926-1954) … As has been noted in the section of this book on the early origins of The Art Association of Harrisburg, Homer St.Gaudens, director of the Carnegie Institute of Pittsburgh, was instrumental in the creation of the organization. Even after the charter had been accepted and the Articles of Incorporation finalized, Mr. St. Gaudens retained his abiding interest in the wellbeing of AAH. It was he in February of 1926 who arranged for a major show of paintings by Sir John Lavery, R.A., of England, as the first exhibition to be presented under the AAH auspices.

According to an article in The Patriot dated February 15, 1926, Harrisburg was chosen instead of Palm Beach as one of the few cities for exhibition of Lavery’s paintings. Apparently, the AAH exhibition committee, chaired by Mrs. Lyman Gilbert of 203 N. Front St. had met to discuss the exhibition, with Homer St. Gaudens planning to arrive the next day to confer with the committee on the location for the show. St. Gaudens had planned the exhibition’s circuit, with it originally including only Boston, New York, Pittsburgh and Palm Beach. It seems that the “difficulty of transportation has made it impossible to take the collection of paintings to Palm Beach, and Harrisburg was chosen instead.”

The article explained that Sir John and Lady Lavery had been spending time in America, traveling with the collection of 46 portraits, interiors, and landscapes selected by the artist himself. An Evening Newsarticle from February 11 had called the paintings one of “the most unusual one-man collections ever exhibited in America.” Sir John Lavery was a member of the Royal Academies of London, Edinburgh, Dublin, Rome, Milan and Stockholm; of the Society of French Artists, Beaux Arts Society of Paris, Society of Spanish Artists in Madrid and of the Secessions of Berlin, Vienna and Munich. The article extolled the fact that Lavery had been knighted by the King of England, by the King of Italy and by the King of the Belgians, and had been awarded the degree of doctor of laws by Queen’s University, Belfast. At that time, Lavery was represented by paintings in the permanent collections of 38 public galleries and museums throughout the world. Obviously, having this collection come to Harrisburg as the premier exhibition of the new Art Association was a real coup, and a testament to the value Homer St. Gaudens placed on the organization he had worked so diligently to create.

The Patriot and The Evening News enthused over the exhibition, running excited articles as the paintings began to arrive. On February 25, 1926, The Patriot announced the arrival of two additional paintings and stated that the Lavery exhibit would open at the Civic Club at 11 AM on February 26 for a ten-day run. The two paintings that arrived were “The Silver Dress,” a portrait of Lady Curzon, and “The Red Hammock,” a portrait of Lady Hazel Lavery reclining in a hammock. The article explained that for each day of the ten days of the exhibition there would be a hostess on duty at the Civic Club to answer questions. The hours each day would be 11 AM to 1 PM, and 2 PM to 10 PM during the week, and 2 PM to 10 PM on Sunday. One hundred and fifty people were expected to attend the pre-showing, with “each trustee of the Art Association given the privilege of inviting 5 guests.”

It was noted that the club’s lecture room had been transformed into a “real art gallery,” with electric light reflectors installed over each painting to “give just the proper amount of light to bring out the rich colourings of the pictures.”

On February 26, The Patriot noted that Dr. C. Valentine Kirby described Lavery as “primarily a portrait painter” when he spoke about the collection at the show’s preview the evening before. The collection of paintings was valued at $100,000, an astonishing sum for 1926. Dr. Kirby explained, “The paintings of Sir John Lavery have something in them that shows he paints for the love of painting and not because he had to. Dr. Valentine was the director of art in the State Department of Education, and had been invited to give his informed comments to the elite group assembled at the Civic Club for the show’s “pre-showing.” Dr. Valentine further said that in Lavery’s interiors and outdoor scenes, the artist almost always included a figure “which seems to fit into the surroundings exactly and belong there.”

Art Association of Harrisburg by Jim BarberBook Release Event:
The Art Association of Harrisburg will be hosting an event to celebrate the release of As the Paint Dries on Friday December 5, 2014, from 5 pm to 8 pm at the association’s headquarters at 21 North Front Street, Harrisburg, PA 17101.

As the Paint Dries: The History of the Art Association of Harrisburg
Authored by Carrie Wissler-Thomas with Michael Barton
List Price: $29.95
ISBN: 978-1-62006-501-3
B&W 6 x 9 in Cloth w/Jacket
196 pages
Sunbury Press, Inc.
BISAC: Art History / USA / Pennsylvania

For more information, please see:
http://www.sunburypressstore.com/As-the-Paint-Dries-9781620065013.htm

For more information about the Art Assocation of Harrisburg, please see:

http://www.artassocofhbg.com/index2.htm