Middle-schoolers investigate haunting in their Pueblo, Colorado school

PUEBLO, Colo.Sunbury Press has released Patricia Santos Marcantonio’s latest young adult paranormal novelThe Ghost Sisters and the Girl in Hallway B.

tgsagihbAbout the Book:
Meet the Ghost Sisters: Kat and Marie Bench.

They love anything to do with ghosts and the supernatural. When their divorced mom moves them to her hometown in Colorado, the sisters discover a real ghost haunts their school—that of a young girl who cries, slams lockers, and leaves mysterious messages as floors writhe, walls weep, and a terrible accident is replayed. Armed with resourcefulness and ghost-hunting tricks they picked up from books and TV, the sisters set out to find the identity of the student apparition. Meanwhile, one of their friends is being bullied. Kat and Marie will need bravery and determination to help their friend and solve the mystery of the girl in Hallway B.

littlegirlExcerpt:
Mr. Castanza stomped to the north end of Hallway B, glanced both ways, and down the stairs. Then he walked to the other end. Nothing. He tried a few classroom doors, but remembered he had locked them all earlier in his shift.

“This place is showing its age again—moaning and creaking. Ain’t nobody here.” He hoped he was right. He briefly wondered if a cat or squirrel had sneaked inside.

With a rumble, his stomach signaled dinner and time for the turkey and provolone sandwich his wife had packed for him. Unplugging the waxer, the janitor felt the temperature drop within seconds.

“The air conditioning must be acting up again,” Mr. Castanza muttered. He didn’t mind talking to himself because night cleaning could be a lonely job. “Middle of the summer, and I can see my breath.” When he blew out air, a white cloud formed and crystallized.

He shivered. “Sure doesn’t feel like air conditioning.” A chill hugged his bones and surrounded his spirit with gloom. Mr. Castanza glanced up at the ceiling. No air conditioning duct was anywhere around. His nose wrinkled. The frigid air smelled like a giant wad of fruity bubble gum that had been chewed by a hundred different kids, all with bad breath.

“What in the blazes?”

A girl stood in front of Room 214. About the size of a seventh-grader, she had straight shoulder-length red hair with bangs. She wore big wire-framed glasses over a thin face. Dressed in a white blouse, red plaid skirt, and blue sweater, the girl held a blue notebook in one hand. Her other hand covered her eyes. Her body shook with heavy sobs, although she made no sound.

“The school is closed, honey,” Mr. Castanza said gently. “We need to call your parents to take you home.”

The girl didn’t answer and continued her silent crying.

The Ghost Sisters and the Girl in Hallway B
Authored by Patricia Santos Marcantonio
List Price: $14.95
5″ x 8″ (12.7 x 20.32 cm)
Black & White on White paper
182 pages
Sunbury Press, Inc.
ISBN-13: 978-1620064733
ISBN-10: 1620064731
BISAC: Juvenile Fiction / Paranormal

Also available on Kindle

For more information, please see:
http://www.sunburypressstore.com/The-Ghost-Sisters-and-th…

February is Women in Horror Month

IMG_6913-WMFebruary is Women in Horror Month. For me, this means I have a great opportunity to learn about other authors as well as promote myself. Sunbury Press has published a few of these women, such as: The Weeping Woman, a ghostly mystery centered on Mexican legend, by Patricia Santos Marcantonio; The Ghosts of Laurelford, a paranormal suspense, by Margaret Meacham; and Seeking Samiel, a supernatural quest where the anti-Christ seeks the devil—Samiel, her lover by, Catherine Jordan.

Then, there are the women characters of horror. Studying them has been a great lesson and who doesn’t love the bad-ass chicks, such as: Alma/Eva in Ghost Story, Annie in Misery, Miriam in The Hunger, Lucy in Dracula, and Rynn in The Little Girl Who Lived Down the Lane. Claudia in Interview with the Vampire, Rebecca and Mrs. Danvers in Rebecca, and last but not least, The Bible’s Jezebel.

Those women are not delicate, sensitive or passive. They are good and bad, sweet and salty, and they will dish out whatever they are backhanded. They have dark feelings and fears that every woman can identify with in some capacity. Like reaching out and taking something, no matter what the violent cost, just because they want it.

Which brings me to my novel titled, Seeking Samiel, where the female antagonist, Eva, is the self proclaimed anti-Christ, the Lamia, seeking out her long lost lover, Samiel. She is based on the Lamia folklore and is half serpent, half female, demon and human. All men, with the exception of one, play a role in her life as surrogate chumps and wind up on her dinner table when she is finished them. Burp.

Women are not supposed to like violence or gore, or be overly aggressive. We are usually the weaker sex, sensitive—the victim. But, what am I to take away from a book that portrays my gender as a victim of circumstances, silly and weak and thereby deserving of the predictable fate on the pages? Eva is no victim. She is a horrible woman. I loved writing about her and fleshing out her nature. As a horror writer, I don’t know how successful I am at scaring, but my favorite female authors and female characters have influenced my writing, for the better, I hope.