Big game hunter and adventurer also served our country in Vietnam

NEWBURGH, N.Y.Sunbury Press has released Adventures in Distant and Remote Places: A Memoir, William E. Lemanski’s recounting of his various quests.

About the Book:
aidarp_fcThis memoir by William E. Lemanski, award winning author of Lost in the Shadow of Fame, covers some of his many adventurous travels in war, sailing, fishing and big game hunting. Spanning well over forty years, Lemanski discusses hunting trips across North America from New Mexico to artic Canada as well as pursuing some of the dangerous game of Africa. A graphic and poignant picture is portrayed of the night-time hostilities around Saigon during the Vietnam War and its emotional impact on a plane load of young paratroopers. His sailing adventures will convey the excitement and danger he and his friends experienced while braving a severe storm far out at sea in a small sailboat. These and other adventures will entertain and excite those of a kindred spirit with an interest in unusual travel – far from the beaten path.

Contents:
1-Sailing through Storm Seas
2-Cruising in Strange Waters
3-Fishing Alaskan Waters
4-A Journey to Hades in the Age of Aquarius
5-Army Duty in a Historic Paradise
6-Hunting Caribou in the Far North
7-In Black Bear Country
8-Moose, the Giant Deer of the North
9-The Fleet footed Phantom of the Great Plains
10-Adventures on the Dark Continent
11-Why do we Hunt?

Excerpt:
On our third day out we spotted the tail end of what appeared to be a sizeable herd. After immediately beaching the canoe I began trudging after Norman who somehow seemed to sense how the caribou would move. Hiking across the tundra becomes quite a physical workout after only a few hundred yards. Due to the perpetually frozen permafrost just beneath the surface and the high winter winds, nothing larger than sparse shrub-brush will grow. Where no large boulders protrude, the ground is covered in a thick blanket of spongy lichens and moss. As you walk across this green carpet, your weight will sink into the growth and squish into a watery layer above the frozen sub-surface, not unlike running on a sandy beach. Adding to this sticky muck are the endless undulations of hillocks rising in some cases to over 50 feet that add to your exertion along with numerous streams and rivulets of water forcing you to either slop through or spend time hopping across rocks.

Norman and I continued in this manner in quick time for about two miles following a few herd stragglers before reaching the main group. After climbing up a rise, spread before us was a congregation of perhaps thousands of caribou, covering many acres of the valley below. Some were feeding on the ground cover and some were prancing about as many of the calves were tagging along behind their mothers.

At this point, the challenge now for the hunter is to pick out what appears to be the best member of the herd within reasonable shooting range, without spooking or inadvertently hitting any of the numerous animals. This is a somewhat difficult task as the wealth of numbers excites the trigger finger and dulls the judgment. Adding to the confusion, females of the species also carry antlers, albeit smaller in size than the male. The ideal goal is to select an animal with large, high curves to the antlers, a large set of spikes pointing to the rear on each, a large set of what are called bez, i.e., two protruding pieces of antler pointing forward and what we call a “double shovel” caribou. This is an animal that will carry two additional symmetrical and wide, palmate antler protrusions just ahead of his eyes. Arriving at an accurate decision of which to take while winded, excited, and overwhelmed seeing this magisterial display of nature for the first time is a test of one’s discipline, not to mention shooting skill.

While lying prone and breathless with my rifle steadied on a large rock, I spied what I thought was a fine trophy bull approximately 200 yards distant. As I set the crosshairs of the .308 Ruger behind the caribou’s shoulder and squeezed the trigger, the 180-grain, Nosler Partition bullet hit home. The animal immediately dropped as the unsuspecting herd continued to graze. Although not a record book quality trophy, the near perfect symmetrical antlers arched fairly high, with long tines pointing to the rear and wide bez that appeared as twin hands with multiple fingers on each.

After spooking the heard while retrieving our kill, Norman immediately gutted the animal and removed the liver. I prepared a small fire with dried moss and pieces of twig I scavenged, and we feasted on the large barbecued organ.

About the Author:
LemanskiWilliam E. Lemanski, a Viet Nam combat veteran, has a former engineering background in the nuclear power industry.  Since retiring from both the New York Power Authority and Entergy Nuclear Northeast, he has been a freelance journalist in the Hudson Valley of New York, has held public office as a councilman and served as a police commissioner in the Town of Tuxedo, New York.  When not researching new book material, he spends time traveling the world on various big-game hunting expeditions.

Adventures in Distant and Remote Places: A Memoir
Authored by William E. Lemanski
List Price: $14.95
6″ x 9″ (15.24 x 22.86 cm)
Black & White on Cream paper
140 pages
Sunbury Press, Inc.
ISBN-13: 978-1620065266
ISBN-10: 1620065266
BISAC: Travel / Essays & Travelogues

For more information, please see:
http://www.sunburypressstore.com/Adventures-in-Distant-an…

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